Searching Library Literature & Information Science Full Text

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In this tutorial, you will learn how to find articles using Library Literature & Information Science Full Text.

This database is a key resource for anyone studying library and information science. It includes articles and book reviews from over 400 journals, as well as book chapters, library school theses, and conference proceedings.

Search by keyword

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We will be looking for information on how college students use e-books and their attitudes towards them.

                     

Your Turn:

  • Using the main search box type e-books
  • Click Search

Search by keyword

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You should have around 4500 results.

Your Turn:

  • Scroll down through your results.

How relevant are these results to our original topic of college students and e-books?

Adding Keywords

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Similar to Google, using just one keyword will not get you the results you need.

However, unlike Google, how you combine your words in most library databases is paramount.

Your Turn:

  • Scroll back up to the top
  • Clear your current search
  • Now search e-books college students

Adding Keywords

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Opps! Now you only have two results. Let's use Boolean operators to create a better search.

Your turn:

  • Search e-books and students and college

Using AND makes a big difference. You should have around 140 results.

Adding Keywords

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Another useful Boolean operator is OR.

There are several different words we can use instead of college including university and academic.

Let's add these.

Your Turn:

  • Go back to the search box and change your search to read:

e-books and students and (college or university or academic)

Adding Keywords

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What happened to your results?

Using Subject Terms

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Keywords are just one way you can search library databases.

You can also search subject headings or terms which are supplied by the database. Subject searches usually yield more relevant results.

First, let's find out what vocabulary this database uses.

Your Turn:

  • Click the Thesaurus link

          

Using Subject Terms

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You will now search the thesaurus to locate subject terms.

We will first look for the correct terms for college libraries.

Your Turn:

  • In the second search box, search college
  • Click Browse

            

Using Subject Terms

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Instead of college libraries, this thesaurus uses Academic libraries.

Your Turn:

  • Click the Academic libraries link
  • Now, place a check mark next to Academic libraries
  • Click Add

               

Using Subject Terms

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Now look at the top search box.

Academic libraries was added as a search term. Note that DE was also added. This abbreviation tells the database to search the subject fields for this term.

Let's repeat this step for e-books

Your Turn

  • Clear the thesaurus search box
  • Search e-book

Using Subject Terms

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Take a look at your results. Which subject term should you use?

Using Subject Terms

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Your Turn:

  • Click the link for Electronic books
  • Now, place a check in the box next to Electronic books
  • Change the OR to and AND so you search both terms

              

  • Click ADD

Using Subject Terms

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Your main search should now look like this:

(DE "Academic libraries") AND (DE "Electronic books")

Your Turn:

  • Click Search

   

Using Subject Terms

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 Take a look at some of your results.

Although these are somewhat related to our original topic, we can get even more relevant results by changing the sorting order.

Your Turn:

  • Change Date Newest to Relevance
  • Scroll through some of these results

Using Subject Terms

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Although some of these results are more relevant, too many are off-topic.

We need a few more keywords.

Your Turn:

  • In the second search box type (attitudes or preferences)

          

  • Click Search

Using Subject Terms

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Although you only have 20 results, they are all more relevant to our topic.

However, you are looking for peer reviewed articles, so let's limit to this.

What is peer reviewed?

Your Turn:

  • Using the Refine Results menu on the left, scroll down to Limit To
  • Check Scholarly (Peer Reviewed Journals)

Using Subject Terms

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Now how many results do you have?

Access Articles

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There are number of things you can do once you find an article that looks promising.

Your Turn:

  • Locate the article Why undergraduate students choose e-books
  • Click on the title

Access Articles

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Scan this page to answer some questions about this article.

What is the name of the peer-reviewed journal?

Access Articles

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According to the abstract, when both choices are available do students prefer e-books or print books?

Format citations

1 of 2There are number of tools that you can use to quickly, email, print and cite and article.

Your Turn:

  • Click the Cite icon and link in the right column under tools
  • Scroll through the list of different citation formats

Format citations

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Is the citation format MLA represented here?

Congratulations!

You have completed this tutorial.

We hope you enjoyed this introduction to this database.

We encourage you to get to familiarize yourself with other features.

Please go on to the next slide to leave us feedback.

 

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