Living the Future 7: Transforming Libraries Through Collaboration

Conference Presentations

Plenary Sessions

Breakout Sessions

Poster Session

Plenary Sessions

CoLAB Planning ®: Moving Mountains Together

Enabling Digital Scholarship Through Strategic Partnerships: A Leadership Imperative

Library Collaborations: Why and How

Interactive Closing Session: A Collaborative Review of Lessons Learned

CoLAB Planning ®: Moving Mountains Together

Facilitator: Bess de Farber, University of Arizona Libraries

CoLAB – Community Foundation of Broward, Florida

 

CoLAB Planning® is a large-group facilitated workshop designed to connect participants’ resources, networks, and skills using a “speed dating” process created by Bess de Farber, Grants and Revenue Manager of the University of Arizona Libraries.  This workshop will be held during the Living the Future 7 Conference on Thursday, May 1, 2008 from 1:30-3:50pm.

CoLAB – Florida Atlantic University

 

CoLAB Planning® is one method for supporting a renewed vision for libraries as conveners of academic or community resources.   Learn to experiment with collaborative relationships that can yield creative ideas you never would have dreamed of on your own. CoLAB Planning® is a facilitative process that takes individual and organizational potential to its highest possible use. 

The workshop will illustrate the power of unearthing dormant resources within all participants.

CoLAB - ACRL 2007, Baltimore, MD

CoLAB facilitation methods have been used to connect more than 390 individuals and 272 organizations.  100% of those who attended CoLAB sessions shared that they walked out the door with new relationships and useful information.  According to the director of the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County, "The CoLAB experience provided me with more collaborative partners than I could have anticipated."

 

 

Enabling Digital Scholarship Through Strategic Partnerships: A Leadership Imperative

Presenter: Richard Luce, Robert Woodruff Library, Emory University

The proliferation of IT and research application tools has changed the way that readers and researchers work, which is frequently labeled as eResearch or digital scholarship. Building strategic partnerships with faculty, PI’s and industry players is called for, yet often difficult to execute. Strategic planning, business management tools, and technology-based approaches often still fall short. Using the Emory University Libraries as an example of navigating in this arena, this talk with provide a mix of inward and outward focused examples of forging new approaches to enabling digital scholarship.

Library Collaborations: Why and How

Presenter: David W. Lewis, IUPUI University Library

Beginning with the assumptions presented in Lewis' September 2007 College & Research Libraries article, “A Strategy for Academic Libraries in the First Quarter of the 21st Century.”  The presentation will explore the reasons why academic libraries will be required to collaborate both on and off campus in order to be effective in the future.  It will then consider how do manage effective collaborations.  Examples of collaborations such and the IU/ChaCha project and others will be presented.

Interactive Closing Session: A Collaborative Review of Lessons Learned

Presenter: Ernie Nielsen, Brigham Young University

During this interactive – and lively – session together, practical techniques will be presented for applying the varied lessons learned in a fast-paced, often-changing environment. Tangible practices to support the over-arching values of organization change will include:

  • Creating focus
  • Integrating various concepts into an initiative
  • Prioritizing efforts to ensure strategic alignment
  • Creating an environment of influence
  • Knowing what “done” looks like

 

Breakout Sessions

Building a Digital Cultural Heritage Resource: BCR’s Collaborative Digitization Program

Building Community: The Sonoran Desert Knowledge Exchange

ClimateQUAL™ – Organizational Climate and Diversity Assessment (OCDA)

Collaborating Across Campus Toward Cross-Cultural Communication

‘Design Thinking’ to Enhance Library Services: A Blended Librarians Perspective

Establishing a Digital Library Infrastructure in Afghanistan

Following the TRAIL: Gift-Cultures and Collaborative Efforts for the Library Community

Librarian-Faculty Collaboration: An Imperative with Transformative Implications

A Library Special Collection in a Unique Collaboration: The Center for Creative Photography and the Phoenix Art Museum

Mellon Library/Faculty Fellowship for Undergraduate Research

Modeling Cyberinfrastructure Services through Collaborative Research

RLG Programs and International Collaboration

Supporting Metadata Management for Data Curation: Problem and Promise

Building a Digital Cultural Heritage Resource:  BCR’s Collaborative Digitization Program

Presenter: Brenda Bailey-Hainer, Bibliographical Center for Research (BCR)

Originally started as the Colorado Digitization Project (CDP) funded with an LSTA grant, the CDP was one of the earliest programs in the U.S. to embrace the participation of museums, libraries, archives and historical societies in its statewide digital initiatives.  The recipient of a number of additional LSTA, IMLS, and NEH grants, the CDP expanded into a multi-state initiative.  Now referred to as BCR’s CDP (Collaborative Digitization Program), the program continues to build on the strength of its members to collaborate on setting standards and best practices to be used in group digitization projects.  This session will cover the evolution of the program, including the governance structure, the initial planning process, techniques used to effectively move the initiative forward and the evolution of the organization into its current incarnation.

Building Community: The Sonoran Desert Knowledge Exchange

Presenters: Kimberly Chapman & Jim Martin, Science-Engineering Library, and Holly Hartmann, Office of Arid Lands Studies, University of Arizona

The University of Arizona Libraries has developed several collaborative projects at local, regional and national levels. For example, the UA Libraries and the Office of Arid Land Studies at the University of Arizona have worked together on Rangelands West, a collaborative effort involving 19 Western land-grant universities. The UA Libraries and the Office of Arid Land Studies have recently partnered on a new initiative, the Sonoran Desert Knowledge Exchange (SDKE). SDKE is an emerging collaborative effort led by the UA Libraries involving more than 25 educational institutions, community organizations, and research centers. The presenters will share information about the vision of SDKE, the development and content of the project, discuss the roles of SDKE partners and participants, and examine the evolution of SDKE through the lens of collaboration. Issues surrounding the complexities of collaboration will be explored: How are transitions handled from library-led projects to more collaborative projects? What long-term vision is required to incorporate collaborative elements into project stages? What are the challenges and rewards of collaborative projects?

ClimateQUAL™ – Organizational Climate and Diversity Assessment (OCDA)

Presenter: Sue Baughman, University of Maryland

This presentation will discuss ClimateQUAL™ - Organizational Climate and Diversity Assessment (OCDA), a joint project of the University of Maryland Libraries and Industrial/Organizational Psychology Program and the Association of Research Libraries. This national collaborative project, in its second year of a multi-year effort, has included other academic institutions to create a capability to measure organizational climate and diversity. A web-based survey instrument has been developed based on the University of Maryland Libraries model and is designed to provide participating institutions information on where their climate and diversity efforts need improvement, in the view of collective staff opinion. Based on the first year’s work, the results show that the instrument is applicable across institutions. Among the most important findings in Phase I, are clear positive correlations between customer satisfaction with service, the climate of the organization and the climate for diversty. This research is also developing a definition of the “healthy organization.” The findings of the assessment can in turn lead to remedial action to improve climate positively. More information about the project can be found at http://www.lib.umd.edu/ocda/.

Collaborating Across Campus Toward Cross-Cultural Communication

Presenters: Karen Brown and Kate Marek, Dominican University

As is happening on many campuses, Dominican University has in recent years expanded its emphasis on diversity.  It is also true, however, that the term diversity carries various understandings and assumptions which can create barriers to communication and progress.  To that end, we recognized that to be effective in campus-wide dialogues regarding diversity, it would be essential to include voices from across the full campus community.  In spring of 2004, Brown and Marek joined with another graduate library school colleague to organize a series of university-wide events which brought together administrators, faculty, staff, and students from both undergraduate and graduate divisions to promote a better understanding of cross-cultural communication.  This session will provide an overview of the initiative, focusing on the role campus-wide collaboration played in the development and implementation of the event series.

‘Design Thinking’ to Enhance Library Services: A Blended Librarians Perspective

Presenter: John Shank, Pennsylvania State University

This presentation will focus on concepts and practices discussed in the book, Academic Librarianship by Design. The presenter will discuss how ‘design thinking’ combined with instructional technologies helps librarians develop, implement and evaluate new instructional programs and services, and share realistic examples of how design thinking is essential in collaborating with faculty members, information technologists, and instructional design professionals.

Establishing a Digital library Infrastructure in Afghanistan

Presenters: Atifa Rawan and Yan Han, University of Arizona Libraries

Afghanistan workshop attendees seeing their digital access on the computer for the first timeThis program will focus on the creation of an Integrated Library System using an Open Source Software for Afghanistan Academic Libraries and on the digitization of Afghanistan’s unique resources. Since April 2002, the University of Arizona Libraries’ staff have been involved in building capacity for libraries and librarians in Afghanistan. In this program, we will discuss our efforts in working with open source digital libraries’ platforms and customization of the integrated library system interface into both English and the native language of Afghanistan (Persian, Dari), providing and enhancing access to scholarly information resources, and digitizing unique resources, and setting up digitization infrastructure in the country to meet their teaching and research needs. 

The presentation specifically will reflect on digitization efforts including challenges, problems and barriers with language and lack of technological infrastructure. We will also discuss our virtual training efforts in the absence of training on the ground due to security issues in the country and collaboration efforts with other governmental and non-government entities in Afghanistan and abroad.

Following the TRAIL: Gift-Cultures and Collaborative Efforts for the Library Community

Presenters: Joni Blake, GWLA, Maliaca Oxnam, University of Arizona, & Marie Waltz, CRL

This session will examine the development of the Technical Report Archive & Image Library (TRAIL) and its current meta-community. Participants in the Greater Western Library Alliance's (GWLA) TRAIL project have developed a model for complex collaborations that includes both 1) shared management for physical collections; and 2) shared large-scale digital conversion processes. The model supports achieving a shared vision, regardless of the number of participants, geographic location, collection scope, or member assets and is accomplished through the recognition and use of learning organization techniques, social capital and gift-culture principles.  The session will cover the structure that has been developed to address geographic barriers and workflow issues for this massive digitizing project. Discussion will also include how the structure offers institutions a flexible, short-term way to participate in a digitizing project, without breaking the bank or investing in additional computer systems. Audience participation and feedback on the model will be encouraged.

Librarian-Faculty Collaboration: An Imperative with Transformative Implications

Presenter: Dane Ward, Illinois State University

Meaningful and productive collaboration between librarians and faculty remains a significant, though frequently elusive goal for many academic institutions. Paradoxically, while the depth and power of collaboration emerges from the interactions between librarians and faculty, the possibilities for success often results from various institutional factors. Authentic collaboration does not exist in isolation. It is found in colleges and universities that act on their belief in the potential of these relationships to benefit students, faculty and staff.  In this presentation, we will explore various understandings of collaboration, as well as the barriers and pathways to success. Perhaps most importantly, we will discuss and highlight individual and organizational actions that facilitate a capacity to manifest the collaborative imperative. Interdisciplinary research on caring and community-building, organizational culture and learning organizations will provide the basis for this presentation and discussion.

A Library Special Collection in a Unique Collaboration: The Center for Creative Photography and the Phoenix Art Museum

Presenters: Rebecca Senf, Center for Creative Photography

Learn about a real life collaboration between institutions from Becky Senf, Norton Family Assistant Curator of Photography, who has a joint appointment at the University of Arizona and the Phoenix Art Museum. She will highlight the advantages and benefits that have become evident in the collaboration’s first 18 months. She will also discuss the challenges she has encountered and answer questions based on her experiences

Mellon Library/Faculty Fellowship for Undergraduate Research

Presenter: Elizabeth A. Dupuis, University of California, Berkeley

For the past four years the University of California, Berkeley has engaged in an initiative dedicated to enhancing undergraduate education, leveraging campus-wide resources to support and sustain curricular transformation, and strengthening the community of faculty focused on teaching and learning. The Mellon Library/Faculty Fellowship for Undergraduate Research initiative was championed by senior administrators including the University Librarian, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, and Dean of the Undergraduate Division of the College of Letters and Science, and sustained by a collaboration of partners from six academic support units similar to those on most university campuses. Throughout this multi-year project, librarians, educational technologists, and other pedagogical experts partnered with more than 40 faculty from the sciences, social sciences, humanities, and interdisciplinary studies to redesign courses and assignments to incorporate research-based learning. Their work has impacted more than 12,000 students enrolled in the redesigned undergraduate courses, energized a community of faculty, and created a solid foundation for ongoing partnerships among academic support units.

This session will provide a brief background about the initiative, highlights of the activities and impact, and suggestions for other institutions interested in creating a similar initiative based on our evaluation of this projects impact on individual faculty, student learning, and the campus culture.

Modeling Cyberinfrastructure Services through Collaborative Research

Presenter: John B. Howard, Arizona State University

The work of science is being transformed by the dynamics of several circumstances: change in many social, technological and environmental domains is so rapid that science has difficulty keeping up; science is becoming more data-intensive, driven by the need to observe and articulate theories about more and more complex phenomena, and data collection grows exponentially as new technologies facilitate data acquisition on a massive scale; ever more work occurs at the points where traditional scientific disciplines intersect; and there is a growing social expectation that science should help solve emergent, practical problems and project solutions into the future. In sum, the processes of science need to accelerate, to become increasingly inter- (and trans-) disciplinary, and to become more “solution-driven.”

What is the role of research libraries in addressing these challenges? In the absence of clear, successful organizational models, the ASU Libraries has been modeling cyberinfrastructure services in collaboration with multi-disciplinary, data-intensive sponsored research projects. This presentation presents a broad case study of the experience of the past three years, identifying challenges encountered and describing how strategic direction has been charted in response to needs of the scientific community. Topics to be discussed include: library identify and the culture of science; challenges of data classification and organization to enable integrative, multi-domain research; the role of data scientists; integrating scientific and data curation workflows; implementation of digital repository services; and how emergent synergies with research centers and institutes, informatics/computer science, and high-performance computing begin to blur administrative boundaries.

RLG Programs and International Collaboration

Presenter: Nancy Elkington, OCLC Programs and Research

RLG Programs, a part of OCLC Programs and Research, pursues a work agenda with its partners that bridges institutional sectors, national boundaries and technology infrastructures. Projects address common needs in libraries, archives and museums and are shaped to most effectively amplify the value of consensus-building and applied research. Underlying characteristics of these international collaborative efforts will be shared as will examples of current projects that demonstrate the widening impact of collaboration on the cultural heritage community

Supporting Metadata Management for Data Curation: Problem and Promise

Presenter: Elaine L. Westbrooks, Cornell University

Research communities and libraries are on the verge of reaching a saturation point with regard to the number of published reports documenting, planning, and defining e-science, e-research, cyberscholarship, and data curation. Despite the volumes of literature, little research is devoted to metadata maintenance and infrastructure.  Libraries are poised to contribute metadata expertise to campus-wide data curation efforts; however, traditional and costly library methods of metadata creation and management must be replaced with cost-effective models that focus on the researcher’s data collection/analysis process.  In such a model, library experts collaborate with researchers in building tools for metadata creation and maintenance which in turn contribute to the long-term sustainability, organization, and preservation of data. 

This presentation will introduce one of Cornell University Library’s collaborative efforts curating 2003 Northeast Blackout Data.  The goal of the project is to make Blackout data accessible so that it can serve as a catalyst for innovative cross-disciplinary research that will produce better scientific understanding of the technology and communications that failed during the Blackout. Library staff collaborated with three groups: engineering faculty at Cornell, Government power experts, and power experts in the private sector. Finally the core components with regard to the metadata management methodology will be outlined and defined.  Rights management emerged as the biggest challenge for the Blackout project.

Poster Session

Advanced Math (Don't Worry, Not Too Complicated!) for Library Cooperation

Becoming Learning Commons Partners: Working Toward a Shared Vision

DigIn: Educating Information Professionals through Collaboration

A Digital Oral History and Transcription Project of the First Bilingual/Bicultural School in the US

Digitization of Arizona Rural and Agricultural History Documents, 1820-1945

Engaging Partners in the Academic Community

Free Document Delivery Service: Success with Collaboration and Connections

LessonLink: A Portal for Arizona's Teachers

A New Model for Research Support: Integrating Skills, Scholarship, and Technology in a South African Library Consortium

Partnering for Success: Faculty Partnerships in the Purdue University Libraries

Town and Gown: Public and Academic Libraries Collaborate in Service

Unite and Conquer: Collaborative Outreach for Library, Assessment, and E-Learning Resources

Wellness Education: Bridging the Consumer Health Information Gap

Advanced Math (Don't Worry, Not Too Complicated!) for Library Cooperation

Presenter: Katalin Radics, Librarian for the West European Collections, UCLA

The poster will graphically present those ranges of library materials where successful cooperation can be worked out. Different graphic representations will illustrate single access library materials (books, print periodicals, un-networked CD-ROMs, etc.) and multiple access library materials (web based online resources, networked CD-ROMs, etc.). Ranges for successful cooperation not only differ along the single vs. multiple access parameters, but also along the criterion of the frequency of use: i.e. high and low use; charts will discover these correlations as well. Planning or readjustment of cooperation among multiple institutions requires the capability to extrapolate possible results in terms of the number of acquired library items, copies, and costs. The poster will present calculation methods and charts showing the possible savings, space needs and duplication level that librarians can use when thinking about future cooperation or changing the scope of the existing collaborative projects.

Becoming Learning Commons Partners: Working Toward a Shared Vision

Presenters: Larry Nichols, Writing Center Director, Carol Schneider, Director, Student Academic Services & Judy Solberg, Director of Instructional & Public Services, Lemieux Library, Seattle University

Seattle University began planning in 2002 for a renovation of and addition to A.A. Lemieux Library.  The University wished to transform the current Library (built in 1966) into a dynamic learning resource center, integrating traditional library services with a wide range of collaborative programs.  As planning proceeded, the programs to be added were identified as the Learning Assistance Center, the Writing Center, and a new Oral Communication Center.  Library administrative staff and our Learning Commons Partners initially met with architects and facilities staff to discuss space needs.  As the architectural designs developed, participants recognized a need to create a shared vision of the Learning Commons.  Sharing began with a monthly meeting of the Learning Commons Partners. 

 

Our poster session will illustrate the activities we are using to create a shared understanding of our Learning Commons and how it will operate.  We are in the early stages of a process intended to create a better understanding of our various service areas and challenge us to develop a shared mission, vision, and goals for our Learning Commons which is expected to open in September 2010. 

DigIn: Educating Information Professionals through Collaboration

Presenters: Bruce Fulton, Communications and Outreach Librarian, & Peter Botticelli, Asst. Professor of Practice, University of Arizona, School of Information Resources and Library Science

The Digital Information Management (DigIn) certificate program is a new effort to help information professionals thrive in an increasingly digital environment. The program features a hands-on approach to learning technology, alongside a strongly multi-disciplinary curriculum designed to help students understand how technology is changing collections and services in a broad range of institutions. This program could not exist without collaboration among funding agencies, partner institutions, several units within the University of Arizona, as well as a national panel of advisors. We believe that the long-term success of DigIn will depend heavily on partnerships with libraries and other cultural heritage institutions, educators, and alumni.

A Digital Oral History and Transcription Project of the First Bilingual/Bicultural School in the US

Presenter: Louise Greenfield, Librarian, Social Sciences Team, & Bess de Farber, Grants and Revenue Manager, University of Arizona Libraries

The University of Arizona Libraries is partnering with the UA College of Education, Historical Museum of South Florida and the University of Miami Special Collections Library to create, and make electronically accessible, an oral history of the first federally funded bilingual/bicultural school in the country in Miami, Florida (Coral Way Elementary). The national impact of this original bilingual program influenced federal legislation and Arizona’s educational system. Much of the existing published information about the school, such as text book references are either incorrect or incomplete.

The poster session will map out the process of planning and implementing this outreach and collaborative effort. It will describe the plans for the oral history project which will capture through personal interviews the stories and memorabilia of those teachers, administrators, students and their parents involved in the first five years of the program (1963 – 68).

Digitization of Arizona Rural and Agricultural History Documents, 1820-1945

Presenters: Marianne Stowell Bracke, Charlotte Cushman, Yan Han, Doug Jones, Gene Liptak, Jim Martin, University of Arizona Library

The University of Arizona Library is participating in the “Preservation of the Literature of Agriculture” project, which is overseen by Cornell University. We are one of three Libraries in the final phase of this USAIN/NEH funded grant project, and are coordinating the digitization over 1,000 books, serials, pamphlets, and other printed materials on the history of state and local agriculture and rural life in Arizona published between 1820 and 1945. All digitized content will be made freely available on the web. These materials were selected and rated by a scholarly panel of historians and scientists at the University of Arizona with the assistance of librarians.

Our poster will describe the creation of the bibliography and ranking system, the outsourcing of the digitization process, and the challenges inherent in securing copyright permissions and locating and arranging for the digitization of rare materials that are not widely held. We will also describe the development of a tracking database being used to manage the project and provide an overview of our technical specifications and quality control process. Details on the project can be found at http://usain.org/.

Engaging Partners in the Campus Community

Presenters: Susan Hyatt, Director of Development, and Andrea W. Stewart, Associate University Librarian, Administration, Development and Human Resources, the The Gelman Library System, The George Washington University

Historically, The Gelman Library System (GLS) has often not been considered in University Development planning and funding strategies.  Additionally, all academic libraries face the challenge of identifying a natural constituency base. In the past two years, the GLS has taken several steps towards reversing these trends.  The objective is to change the culture so that it becomes one where the Library is a natural place to look for programs and events.  By engaging partners in the campus community through meetings, education, and seeking out active collaborations, we have begun to experience success.  Our goal is that the GLS is regularly consulted by our campus partners to increase our visibility and funding to meet our mission and that of the University. We serve as a place for those otherwise uncommitted donors to become reconnected to their University. Our poster will describe collaborations through events, activities and joint fundraising efforts.

Free Document Delivery Service: Success with Collaboration and Connections

Presenters: Linda Dols, Becky Gonzalez, Kathleen Lee, and Jeanne F. Voyles, University of Arizona Libraries

The University of Arizona Libraries implemented free in-house article delivery for the entire campus in August 2006.  The success of collaborating with other universities and teams in the library resulted in making the Express Document service a premiere service for our faculty, staff and students.

                       

Learn about what we did and how we did it—our connections with Greater Western Library Alliance consortial partners for benchmarking this type of service, how we created a business plan, what steps were taken to implement the service, the technology purchased and implemented, our collaboration with other teams in the library, and how we measured our progress. 

LessonLink: A Portal for Arizona's Teachers

Presenters: Alexandra Rivera and Raik Zaghloul, Outreach Librarians, Undergraduate Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

The University of Arizona has many useful resources for K-12 instructors that have been developed by different programs and departments and, until now, have been difficult to locate. The UA Libraries has developed a new resource called LessonLink that pulls together over 100 online resources for K-12 instructors. With this rich database, teachers only need to go to one site to access this material selected by a UA librarian for relevancy and applicability. Instructors can locate lesson plans, content for classroom activities, information about UA onsite campus visits, classroom visits from UA faculty and grad students, and programs for professional development. Teachers can search this database by subject and grade level.

This poster will describe why and how this resource was developed, how it works, and its potential for outreach.

A New Model for Research Support: Integrating Skills, Scholarship, and Technology in a South African Library Consortium

Presenter: Colin Darch, PhD, the University of Cape Town, South Africa

The project – A New Model for Research Support: Integrating Skills, Scholarship, and Technology in a South African Library Consortium – aims to model the transformation and enrichment of support to researchers offered by South African academic libraries. The guiding premise of this project is that the three institutions should take advantage of existing strengths as South Africa’s leading academic libraries to sustain, improve, and consolidate the troubled research enterprise in South Africa.

Funded by the Carnegie Corporation this innovative program seeks to achieve its objectives through a multi-pronged project with three closely interrelated components:

 

  1. Building a sophisticated Web-based shared portal which will provide access to a wide range of international and local electronic content for postgraduate students and academics;
  2. Enhancing the skills of existing library staff in order to create a critical mass of support for research to be offered by librarians with real subject expertise (the South African Library Academy at the Mortenson Center and observation at a major US research library).
  3. Creating a technologically sophisticated physical space – a ‘one-stop shop’ – for postgraduates and academic staff who need assistance with research.

Partnering for Success: Faculty Partnerships in the Purdue University Libraries

Presenter: Marianne Stowell Bracke, Agricultural Sciences Information Specialist, Purdue University Libraries

The need for reference librarians to assume new roles has been widely discussed, and being more proactive in working with faculty generally plays a large role in these discussions. In many institutions, however, these shifts have not occurred as quickly as hoped. Although there may be a number of reasons for this, one of the most important is that there is no best practice that can be broadly implemented across libraries or even within a single library. Rather, it is critical to identify the needs of faculty and match them with both the skills and knowledge of librarians and the resources of libraries. Identification and exploration of these possibilities is only viable through dialogue and partnership with faculty. This poster will present a number of examples of these partnerships at Purdue University, as well as support resources that need to be in place for success. Examples will include partnerships with academic programs to increase faculty awareness of resources to improve teaching, fostering information literacy in interdisciplinary courses, and collaborating to curate research data.

Town and Gown: Public and Academic Libraries Collaborate in Service

Presenters: Alex Rivera, Outreach Librarian, & Gabrielle Sykes-Casavant, Special Assistant to the Dean, University of Arizona Libraries

The University of Arizona Libraries offers its users more than just access to our print collections – we also provide electronic document delivery, presentation practice rooms, group study rooms, and helpful research and reference assistance in person, by phone, or by live chat or email. These services support the academic needs of our students and our campus. Campus life, however, is more than academics – and that’s where the Pima County Public Library (PCPL) steps in.

Visit the “Town and Gown: Public and Academic Libraries Collaborate in Service” poster session and see how Pima County Public Library and The University of Arizona Libraries launched an exciting new collaboration that brings PCPL librarians to campus to increase awareness among students, staff and faculty of the great online and branch services that all of our public libraries offer.

Unite and Conquer: Collaborative Outreach for Library, Assessment, and E-Learning Resources

Presenters: Tom Paradis, Office of Academic Assessment, & Kathleen Smalldon, Cline Library, Northern Arizona University

Creating opportunities to share student learning and assessment resources with faculty can be a daunting challenge. At Northern Arizona University (NAU) in Flagstaff, the leaders representing six different service units and committees united to create a flexible outreach session for academic units on campus. Here we share our collaborative approach to “unite and conquer,” combining the human, technical, and financial resources of six service units and institutional committees to produce an informative outreach program for some 1,100 full- and part-time faculty members. Participating units included Cline Library, E-Learning Center, Office of Academic Assessment (OAA), Faculty Development, the University Assessment Committee, and the Liberal Studies Committee. During our “pilot” year, we visited 23 academic units and some 290 faculty members at faculty meetings. We experienced significant improvements overall with our approach and presentations between the fall and spring semesters. Our poster informs viewers of our organizational strategy, followed by an overview of successes, challenges, lessons learned, and future plans. We view this outreach effort as a pilot-project success story, looking forward to reviving the collaborative outreach sessions during 2008-2009.

Wellness Education: Bridging the Consumer Health Information Gap

Presenter: Adriana Rendon, Cecilia Tovar & Aaron Valdivia, Knowledge River Scholars

WE (Wellness Education) Search is a mentorship program that focuses on consumer health information resource development and education for teens and their surrounding communities, as well as hands-on exposure to health sciences librarianship. It is a collaboration between health sciences information professionals, Knowledge River Scholars from the School of Information Resources and Library Science at the University of Arizona, and Sunnyside High School in Tucson, Arizona.

Six Knowledge River mentors and twelve Sunnyside High School students develop and provide consumer health information services to teachers, students, and the Tucson community. These services include creating awareness of resources through outreach programs, presentations, school events, and community events. The Knowledge River mentors provide instruction in information resource skills and career development to the students in the WE Search program. The students are empowered through active involvement in the planning and implementation of programs, presentations, and events.

The poster provides a comprehensive look at the WE Search program through four modules which increase awareness of consumer health information resources. This poster will be an opportunity to share the findings and outcomes of a collaborative program that strives to bridge the consumer health information gap.

 

 

Please contact us with any questions.