UA Library

Prescott Journal Miner

July 11, 1917

Globe I. W. W. Want No Mediation

NEW ANGLE IS FOUND WHEN STRIKERS TELL CONFERENCE OFFICERS THEY MUST TALK TO OWNERS DIRECT.

Sherrif’s Order Is Start For Trouble

UNION MEN DO NOT CARE FOR DEFINITION OF “PLACE” PROTEST PICKET RULE TO GOVERNOR CAMPBELL.

By Associated Press.

            GLOBE, July 10. – Because the Industrial Workers’ strike is part of a national movement for the betterment of conditions, the leaders declared, they cannot participate in the strike mediation conference being held here by representatives of the State and Federal governments. The organization, the leaders say, takes the position that the movement is national and they can treat only with the mine owners direct and refuse to consider any efforts toward reconciliation which does not come direct from the owners.

            In addition the leaders have informed the mediators that a permanent settlement here cannot be effected until satisfactory settlements are reached in other metal mining camps on the basis of the Miami wage scale. Intimation is made that the strike might spread to the railroads and water transportation organizations, grain fields and other allied organizations of the working men. The threat is made to tie up all freight going into the affected district unless a settlement is effected. Federal Conciliator John McBride and his secretary left in an automobile for Phoenix tonight on what was said to be important business.

            The strike situation, which had been quiet since Sunday, grew tense shortly after noon when a party of deputy sheriffs in charge of a brother of Sheriff Armer, rode to Copper Hill and informed the pickets there they must disperse.

            Picketing, they said, still would be allowed, but only one picket might be at one “place.”

            A “place” was defined as an area a quarter mile square. Miners were told not to congregate near mine entrances.

            A delegation of members of the international union called on Governor Campbell and protested the order as unfair. The union men indignantly asserted they were obeying the law and were maintaining only a peaceful picket at the Copper Hill mines.

Walter Douglas Arrives.

            Walter Douglas, president of the Phelps-Dodge Corporation and a director of the Old Dominion Mining & Smelting Company, arrived today on a special train from Douglas, to confer with General Manager P. G. Beckett of the Old Dominion Company.

            John Donnelly, president of the Arizona Federation of Labor, who spoke at Miami last night, left today for Morenci and Clifton, where he is in charge of the strike of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers.

Joint Conference Planned.

            The joint State and Federal mediation board having given individual hearings to the three elements involved in the copper miners’ strike in the Globe-Miami district, it was expected today that an effort would be made to bring the opposing factions together in an effort to effect a settlement.

            The operators were heard Saturday, the delegation from the International union were heard Sunday and representatives of the I. W. W. conferred with the board yesterday.


Army Officer at Ray

            An army officer was sent to Ray, today to investigate labor conditions there at the request of Governor Campbell.

            Reports from Bisbee, where the miners also are on strike, are that more men are returning to work.