8. GRAZING LANDS.—EXTENT.—STOCK RAISING.—WOOL, ETC.


Up: Contents Previous: 7. AGRICULTURAL AND FARMING LANDS.—EXTENT, LOCATION, ETC. Next: 9. WOOD, TIMBER, ETC.

THE larger portion of Arizona is emphatically a grazing and stock raising country, and is capable of supporting and fattening an immense number of cattle and sheep. There are but few localities in the whole Territory destitute of rich and nutritive grasses, and at least forty million acres of land is fully equal for grazing, to any on the continent, all of which is well supplied with water conveniently near to the stock ranges.

The wild grasses of the country are very nutritious, embracing varieties of the wild clover, wild barley and oats, black, white, and curly gramma grass, sacatone, six week grass, many varieties of bunch grass, etc., etc.

The mountains, foot hills, and rolling lands, are literally covered with a velvety green for most of the year, and having two rainy seasons, the hills and mountain sides do not present that bleak and barren appearance so characteristic of California


[page 55]

scenery for many months of the year. The excellent grazing qualities of Arizona have already attracted the attention of stock men of the contiguous States and Territories, and during the past year many thousands of horses, cattle, and sheep have been taken to the Territory from California, Oregon, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and other places. The number of sheep in the Territory is now nearly two million, yet they are scarcely noticed, so extensive is the range.

Arizona is destined at no distant day to become one of the most successful wool producing sections of the Union, and when railroads traverse the country, and connect it with San Francisco and other cities on the Pacific slope, and with St. Louis, Chicago, New Orleans, and other cities east, the rich beef and mutton, from a thousand hills and valleys in Arizona, will be supplied to those markets at reasonable rates, and her wool, free from burrs and other impurities, will be eagerly sought for by the great manufactories of the older States. The climate of Arizona is so mild that when sheep and cattle become well acclimated, there is but little necessity for protection from storm or wind. The mountain ranges of the Territory are extremely favorable to stock raising, and as there are numerous springs and rivulets there, those localities are at present the most favorable points for location. The grasses in the great


[page 56]

valleys, especially in the southeastern part of the Territory, are very abundant, and where water can be had, they afford splendid ranges for stock of all kinds.

The section of country watered by the Chiquito Colorado River is especially favorable for sheep raising, as is also the region of country around Prescott, and thence to the north in the region of country around the San Francisco and Bill Williams mountains. The same can also be said of the country south of Tucson, embracing the country around the Santa Rita, Patagonia, Huachuca, Whetstone, Dragoon, and Chiricahua mountains, and in the contiguous valleys. There is no employment more healthful, pleasant, or profitable than stock raising, and for young men of good habits, combined with watchfulness, care, and energy, there is no surer road to competence and wealth than this. It also offers fine inducements to those having debilitated constitutions, and to those broken down in health, to engage in a business which requires constant out-door exercise, either on foot or on horseback, in a climate clear, pure, and exhilarating, where in a few years health can be fully restored, and a fortune accumulated.

Too much cannot be said of the future prospects of Arizona in this respect, all of which will be fully verified in a few short years.

Up: Contents Previous: 7. AGRICULTURAL AND FARMING LANDS.—EXTENT, LOCATION, ETC. Next: 9. WOOD, TIMBER, ETC.




© Arizona Board of Regents