12. METEOROLOGY.


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At all rendezvous camps hourly observations were taken, as follows: Barometric readings, using cistern and aneroid barometers; wet and dry bulb thermometric readings were also taken;


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the direction of the wind was also observed, and its force as determined with an anemometer. The general record also included the character and amount of clouds, time of beginning and ending of rain and snow storms, and the amount of fall. Also such phenomena as would be included under the general head of meteorological data.

At ordinary camps, observations were taken at 7 a. m., 2 p. m., and 9 p. m., or where the time of going into or breaking camp was such as to render this impossible, observations were taken upon arriving and upon leaving, and the hours noted. Observations were taken while on the march at the topographical stations with an aneroid, carefully compared with a cistern barometer.

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