INDEX.


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[page 365]

INDEX.

  • ABO PUEBLOS—Visited by Zaldivars of Oñates expedition
  • 40
    • ACOMA—Oñate puts down revolt of Indians at
  • 31
      • destruction of pueblo at
  • 46
    • ACUMA, SERGT. ALFAREZ FRANCISCO—Accompanies one of Kino's expeditions
  • 59
    • AGUATUVI, SAN BERNARDINO DE—Early Spanish mission
  • 55
    • AGUILAR, CAPT.—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 39
    • AHACUS—See Hawaikuh
    • AJO COPPER MINES—Taken possession of by Arizona Mining and Trading Company and worked
  • 278
    • ALARCON, HERNANDO DE—Sent in command of naval expedition and discovers Colorado River
  • 19
      • returns to New Spain
  • 21
    • ALBUQUERQUE—Mention of by Lieut. Pike
  • 83
    • ALCARAZ, DIEGO DE—Placed in command of Village of the Hearts
  • 20
    • ALDRICH, MARK—First treasurer of Territory
  • 326
    • ALLEN, MAJOR B.—One of organizers of Arizona Mining & Trading Co.
  • 278
    • ALLENCASTER, GOVERNOR—Early governor of New Mexico
  • 87
    • ALTAR, PRESIDIO OF—Ordered changed
  • 68
    • ALVARADO, HERNANDO DE—Helps save Coronado at fight at Seven Cities of Cibola
  • 18
    • AMPUDIA, GENL.—Mexican who ordered Gen. Zachary Taylor from banks of Rio Grande
  • 128
    • ANTISELL, DR. THOMAS—Member of Lieut. Parke's exploring party
  • 269
    • ANTONIO, JUAN—Principal chief of Pimas, gives assistance to Gen. Kearny and Lieut.-Col. Cooke
  • 143
    • ANZA, CAPT. JUAN B.—In command of Presidio of Tubac
  • 74
    • APACHES—First mention of
  • 13
      • make trouble
  • 68
      • unceasing campaigns against
  • 69
      • friendly rancheria at Tubac
  • 76
      • destroy missions
  • 76
      • rations cut off, go on warpath
  • 78
      • massacre of by Johnson, and reprisals
  • 117
      • meet Gen. Kearny and trade mules
  • 135
      • craftiness, signals, attacks, characteristics, etc.
  • 199 et seq.
      • rescue of two Mexican boys from by Boundary Commission Survey
  • 210 et seq.
      • killing of one by Boundary Commission Survey teamster and restitution
  • 218 et seq.
      • steal stock of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 227 et seq.
      • Tonto Apaches commit Oatman Massacre
  • 258
      • attack Capt. Cremony's party
  • 272 et seq.
      • early attacks on Tucson
  • 349 et seq.
    • APACHE RESERVATION—Mention of
  • 17
      • early name, "The Wilderness"
  • 26
    • ARCHEVEQUE, PEDRO—One of trading party that purchased Inez Gonzales from Indians
  • 203
    • ARCHULETA—Second in command at Santa Fe
      • obstructs Americans
  • 131
      • leads revolt of natives against Americans
  • 147
      • flees to South
  • 147
    • ARCHULETTI—Navajo chief
  • 307
    • AREDIA, SAVERO—Mexican boy captured by Apaches and rescued by Boundary Commission Survey
  • 211
    • ARIBAC—See Arivaca
    • ARISTA, GENL.—Mexican who advised Gen. Taylor hostilities were considered commenced
  • 128
    • ARISTAIN, MIGUEL—Mexican Commissioner in matter of treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
  • 153
    • ARIVACA—Early history
  • 77
      • deserted after Pima revolt
  • 77
      • rich in mines
  • 77
    • ARIZONA—Name suggested for territory and adopted
  • 322
    • ARIZONA CITY—See Colorado City
    • "ARIZONIAN"—First newspaper in territory, printed by Col. Ed. Cross at Tubac
  • 352
    • ARIZONA MINING & TRADING COMPANY—Formation of
  • 278
      • sends out exploring party
  • 278
      • takes possession of Ajo Copper Mines
  • 278
      • rediscovers Planchas de la Plata
  • 278
      • ordered to leave country by Mexicans
  • 279
    • ARIZUMA—Name suggested for Territory
  • 326
    • ARMIJO, GOVERNOR OF SANTA FE—Establishes duties on goods
  • 91
      • Ambassador Magoffin and Capt. P. St. George Cooke visit to treat with
  • 130 et seq.
      • sends commissioner to United States
  • 131
    • ASUNSION, JUAN DE LA—Supposed to have been first Spaniard to enter Arizona
  • 7
    • AUBREY, FELIX—Mention of
  • 94
      • gives name to localities in Arizona
  • 99
      • his famous ride
  • 100 et seq.
      • exploration for wagon road
  • 353
      • death of
  • 353
    • AVAVARES—Mention of
  • 2
    • AZTECS—Mention of
  • 16
    • BAC—See San Xavier del Bac
    • BACUACHI, VALLEY OF—Mention of
  • 11
    • BANCROFT, GEORGE, SECRETARY OF NAVY—Sends instructions to Commodore Sloat in regard to conquest of California
  • 123
    • BARRANCHE, PADRE—Killed by Yumas
  • 74
    • BARTLETT, JOHN R.—Supersedes J. C. Fremont as Boundary Survey Commissioner
  • 183
      • succeeded by Maj. W. H. Emory
  • 187
      • accounts of interviews with Indians
  • 212 et seq.
    • BASCONZALES, DON JOSEPH DE—Supposed to have been first Spaniard to enter Arizona
  • 6
    • BEALE, LIEUT. EDW. F.—With Kit Carson makes trip to San Diego for aid for Genl. Kearny
  • 100
      • opens wagon road from Fort Defiance, N. M., to California
  • 356
      • use of camels
  • 356 et seq.
    • BEAN, SAMUEL C.—First marshal of Territory of Arizona
  • 326
    • BEARD—Early trader over Santa Fe trail
  • 87
    • BEAR FLAG—Raised by Americans in California
  • 123
    • BEAUBIEN, CHARLES—One of first American judges in New Mexico
  • 133
    • BECKNELL, CAPT.—Early trader over Santa Fe trail
  • 88
    • BELTRAN, FRA—Accompanies Espejo's expedition
  • 28
    • BENDEL—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • BENT, CHARLES—First American Governor of New Mexico
  • 133
      • killed in revolt of natives
  • 147
    • BENT'S FORT—Mention of
  • 107 130
    • BENTON, SENATOR THOS. H.—Mention of
  • 105
      • begins agitation in Congress for Pacific railroad
  • 263
    • BERNAL, LIEUT. CRISTOBAL MARTIN—In command of military escort on one of Kino's expeditions
  • 59
    • BERNAVE, PADRE JUAN CRISTOBERMO GIL DE—In charge at Guevavi
  • 76
    • BIG BUG MINING DISTRICT—Worked by Walker party
  • 298
    • BIGELOW, DR. J. M.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • BILL WILLIAMS' FORK—Reached by Oñate
  • 49
      • reached by Father Jacob Sedelmair
  • 61
    • BLACK CANYON OF COLORADO—First discovered by the younger Pattie
  • 98
    • BLACKLAWS, PETER—Head of trading party that purchased Inez Gonzales from Indians
  • 203
    • BLAIR, FRANCIS P. JR.—First U. S. Attorney in New Mexico
  • 133
    • BLAKE, COL.—With First Dragoons arrives in Santa Cruz Valley
  • 288
    • BLANDING, WM.—One of organizers of Arizona Mining & Trading Company
  • 278
    • BLOOMFIELD—Henry Wickenburg's partner
  • 298
    • BLUMMER, CHARLES—First American treasurer in New Mexico
  • 133
    • BOCANEGRA, JUAN GUTIERREZ—Member of Oñate's Expedition
  • 45
    • BONILLA, DON MANUEL DIAZ—Commissioner for Mexico for purpose of arranging details of "Gadsden Purchase"
  • 189190
    • BOOK—First published in Territory of Arizona
  • 325
    • BOUNDARY COMMISSION SURVEY—J. B. Weller, first Commissioner, superseded by J. C. Fremont, who was superseded by J. R. Bartlett
  • 183
      • boundary line under treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo not established
  • 186
      • boundary line under Gadsden Purchase established
  • 187
      • troubles with Indians, story of Inez Gonzales
  • 199 et seq.
      • story of two Mexican boys and interviews with Mangus Colorado and Delgadito
  • 210 et seq.
      • killing of Apache by teamster and restitution
  • 218 et seq.
      • stock stolen by Apaches
  • 227
      • Dr. Webb's experience with the Yumas
  • 237 et seq.
      • survey completed
  • 264
    • BRADY, P.—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • BRADY, PETER R.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • BRECKENRIDGE, FORT—Established
  • 322
    • BREVOORT—One of first owners of Patagonia Mine
  • 292
    • BRIDGER, JIM—Mention of
  • 107
    • BRODIE, J. P.—Furnishes money for ferry across the Colorado River
  • 235
    • BROOKS, MAJOR—Post commander at Fort Defiance
  • 311
      • has skirmish with Navajos
  • 317
    • BROWN, C. O.—Member of Glanton party who escaped massacre
  • 236
    • BRUNKOW—One of engineers for Sonora Exploring & Mining Co.
  • 280
    • BUCHANAN, FORT—Established
  • 321
    • BUCHANAN, PRESIDENT—Recommends territorial government for Arizona
  • 323
    • BUCHANAN, SECRETARY OF STATE—Makes offers to Mexico
  • 152
    • BUFFALO (COW) COUNTRY—Mention of
  • 5
    • BUFORD, CAPTAIN—Commanding Dragoons who render assistance to Boundary Commission Survey in matter of stolen stock
  • 228
    • BULL, JOHN—Principal surveyor of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • BURKE, COLONEL—Mention of
  • 260
    • CABALLO EN PELO—Yuma chief, hostile to whites
  • 239
    • CABORCA—Mention of town of
  • 329
      • where Henry A. Crabb and party were massacred
  • 333 et seq.
    • CABRILLO—Discovers California
  • 120
    • CALABASAS—Mention of
  • 62
      • history of
  • 77
      • gold mine nearby worked
  • 77
    • CALHOUN—Indian Agent, with Col. Washington, tries to make treaty with Navajos
  • 307
    • CALHOUN, GOV.—With Col. Summer makes treaty with Navajos
  • 308
    • CALIFORNIA—Conquest of by Fremont and Sloat
  • 119 et seq.
      • discovered by Cabrillo
  • 120
      • first colonized by Spaniards
  • 120
      • population of in 1846
  • 122
      • Americans ordered to leave by General Castro
  • 122
      • "Bear Flag" raised by Americans who join Fremont and drive Mexicans south
  • 123
      • taken for United States by Commodore Sloat and Captain Fremont
  • 123 et seq.
      • meeting to consider annexation
  • 151
      • immigration into over southern route
  • 234
    • CALIFORNIA, GULF OF—Alarcon sails up
  • 19
      • Oñate marches to
  • 31
    • CAMPBELL, A. H.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
      • member of Lieut. Parke's second exploring party
  • 269
    • CAMPBELL, HUGH—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • CAMELS—Appropriation by Congress for importation of
  • 354
      • Jefferson Davis instrumental in procuring importation of
  • 354
      • Maj. Henry C. Wayne and Lieut. D. D. Porter commissioned to purchase and bring to United States
  • 354
      • characteristics, habits, etc.
  • 354 et seq.
      • number imported
  • 355
      • used by Lieut. E. F. Beale in opening wagon road in Arizona
  • 356
      • Greek George and Hi Jolly, camel attendants
  • 357
      • abandonment of
  • 360
      • part of herd gathered and taken to Nevada, thence to Sonora
  • 360
      • running wild along Gila—source of annoyance to teamsters
  • 361
      • part of herd taken to menagerie at Kansas City
  • 361
      • roving bands supposed to have been captured by Indians and made into "jerky"
  • 362
      • early introduction into New World
  • 362
      • abilities and habits
  • 363
    • CANYON DE CHELLY—Mention of
  • 306
      • stronghold of Navajos
  • 307308
    • CAPRON, JOHN G.—Description of expedition into Mexico to join Henry A. Crabb
  • 330
      • wounded by Mexicans
  • 337
      • early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • CARBON, COLONEL—Spanish commander of presidio of Tucson, makes peace with Apaches
  • 349 et seq.
    • CARDENAS, GARCIA LOPEZ DE—Helps to save Coronado at fight at Seven Cities of Cibola
  • 18
      • sent out by Coronado in search of large river
  • 22
      • returns to Coronado
  • 24
    • CARLETON, GENL.—Arrests Sylvester Mowry and confiscates his property
  • 293
    • CARSON, KIT—Mention of
  • 94
      • his history; closely identified with Fremont
  • 105 et seq.
      • meets Genl. Kearny and advises him of conquest of California, is persuaded to guide Kearny's command
  • 110 134
      • with Lieut. Beale makes perilous trip to San Diego for aid for Genl. Kearny
  • 110
      • appointed lieutenant in U. S. Rifle Corps by President Polk
  • 111
      • his adventures
  • 111 et seq.
      • appointed Indian Agent by President Pierce
  • 113
      • fatal injury and death
  • 115
    • CASAS, ALFAREZ—Member of Oñate's Expedition
  • 45
    • CASAS GRANDES—Mention of
  • 25
      • visited by Father Kino, first white man to see them—says mass at
  • 59
      • again visits them
  • 59
      • visited by Father Ignacio Keller
  • 61
    • CASTENADA—Historian of Coronado's expedition
  • 24
    • CASTRO, GENL.—Orders Americans to leave California
  • 122
    • CAXCO—See Taxco
    • CHAMBERS—Early trader over Santa Fe trail
  • 87
    • CHAMBERS—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 332
    • CHAMITA—Reached by Oñate
  • 31
    • CHAPITONE—Navajo chief, killing of
  • 308
    • CHAVIS, PABLO—One of leaders of insurrection in New Mexico
  • 148
    • CHICHILTECALE—Or "Little Red House"
  • 17
    • CHUMPO—Acoma chief
  • 46
    • CHURCHES—First in New Mexico founded by Oñate
  • 39
      • built of adobe and brick
  • 70
    • CIBOLA—See Seven Cities of Cibola
    • CLARK, EDWARD C.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • CLIFFORD, HON. NATHANIEL—Commissioner, etc., to Mexico in matter of treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
  • 153
    • COCHETOPE PASS—Mention of
  • 105
    • COCOSPERA—Visited by Father Kino
  • 58
    • COLEMAN, WM. T.—Director in Sonora Exploring & Mining Co.
  • 280
    • COLETTO, AMARILLO—Apache chief with others demands restitution for killing of Apache by Boundary Commission Survey teamster
  • 218 et seq.
    • COLORADO CHIQUITO—Discovered by Espejo
  • 29
      • crossed by Oñate
  • 48
    • COLORADO CITY—Established on California side of Colorado River—name afterward changed to Arizona City, then to Yuma
  • 252
      • survey of
  • 319 352
    • COLORADO FERRY—First established by Lieut. Cave J. Coutts
  • 234 235
      • Dr. Langdon establishes ferry
  • 235
    • COLORADO RIVER—Discovered by Alarcon
  • 19
      • named by Oñate, Rio Grande de Buena Esperanza
  • 49
      • reached by Father Kino
  • 60
      • Padre Garces establishes presidio-pueblo-missions on banks of
  • 73
      • Capt. L. Sitgreaves makes reconnaissance down
  • 264
      • navigation of, see "Navigation"
    • COLT, SAMUEL—Director in Sonora Exploring & Mining Co.
  • 280
    • COLLY—Resident of Santa Fe about 1806
  • 86
    • COMPOSTELA—Mention of
  • 17
    • CONCHOS—Oñate's expedition reaches
  • 38
    • CONDE, GENERAL PEDRO GARCIA—Mexican Commissioner on Boundary Commission Survey
  • 206
      • co-operates with Commissioner Bartlett in rescue of Inez Gonzales
  • 207
    • CONNELLY, DR.—Mexican Commissioner to United States
  • 131
    • CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION—Held at Tucson
  • 325
    • COOK, CAPTAIN—Commends escorts for Santa Fe caravans
  • 89
    • COOK, NATHAN P.—Chosen delegate to Congress
  • 323
    • COOK—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Co.
  • 278
    • COOKE, CAPT. P. ST. GEO.—Sent on peaceful mission to Mexico
  • 130
      • promoted to Lieut. Col.; ordered to take command of Mormon Battalion and follow Genl. Kearny to California
  • 134
      • instructed to open wagon road to the Pacific
  • 135
      • assumes command and commences march with Leroux and Pauline Weaver as guides
  • 137 138
      • reaches Tucson
  • 140
      • letter to Don Manuel Gandara, Governor of Sonora
  • 141 et seq.
      • reaches Pimas
  • 143 et seq.
      • reaches Maricopas
  • 145
      • reaches and crosses Colorado
  • 146
    • COOPER, COL., AND SONS—Early traders over Santa Fe trail
  • 83
    • CORAZONES—Also called Ures, and Village of the Hearts
  • 3 17
    • CORO—Sobaipuri chief, joins Father Kino's expedition
  • 59
    • CORONADO, FRANCISCO VASQUEZ DE—Commands expedition in search or Seven Cities of Cibola
  • 16
      • knocked down by stone in fight at Seven Cities and saved by companions
  • 18
      • his route
  • 25 et seq.
      • return to City of Mexico; resigns from Governorship and retires to estates
  • 26
    • CORTEZ, ALFAREZ JUAN—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 45
    • CORTEZ—One of leaders of insurrection in New Mexico
  • 148
    • COUTO, BERNARDO—Mexican commissioner in matter of treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
  • 153
    • COUTTS, LIEUT. CAVE J.—Commanding escort to Boundary Commission Survey, establishes Fort Calhoun on California side of Colorado and assists immigrants
  • 234
      • establishes first ferry across Colorado River
  • 234 235
    • COZZENS, SAMUEL G.—One of first District Judges of Arizona
  • 326
    • CRABB MASSACRE—Henry A. Crabb induced by Ignacio Pesquiera to take Americans into Mexico to aid in revolt against Gandara; Crabb and party massacred by Pesquiera
  • 327 et seq.
    • CRAIG, LIEUT-COL.—Commanding escort of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 202
    • CREMONY, CAPT. JOHN C.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
      • description of Apaches by
  • 200
      • directs shooting of Delgadito
  • 229
      • accompanies party exploring for mines
  • 271
      • attacked by Apaches; hand to hand fight with one
  • 272 et seq.
    • CRISTOBAL—Interpreter for Oñate's expedition
  • 41
    • CROSS, COL. ED.—Early resident of Tucson, editor and duellist
  • 345
      • prints first newspaper, the "Arizonian," at Tubac, on first printing-press in Territory
  • 352
      • fights bloodless duel with Sylvester Mowry
  • 352
    • CROIX, GENERAL—Effects useful reforms
  • 68
    • CRUZ, SANTA—Early Spanish resident of Tucson
  • 349
    • CRUZADOS—Name given to Indians in vicinity of Rio Verde
  • 49
    • CUEVAS, LUIS G.—Mexican commissioner in matter of treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
  • 153
    • CULIACAN—Mention of
  • 1 et seq.
    • CUSTER, H.—Member of Lieut. Parke's surveying party
  • 269
      • member of Lieut. Parke's second surveying party
  • 269
    • DALGADITO—See "Delgadito"
    • DALLAM, RICHARD—First U. S. Marshal in New Mexico
  • 133
    • DAVIS, JEFFERSON.—Credited with having introduced bill to form Territory, claim disproved
  • 326
      • instrumental in procuring importation of camels into Arizona
  • 354
    • DEFIANCE, FORT—On Colorado at Pilot Knob, mention of
  • 73
      • on California side of Colorado
  • 235
      • near Canyon de Chelly, built by Col. Summer
  • 309
    • DELGADITO, also "DALGADITO"—Apache Chief; arguments against Boundary Commission Survey taking away captive Mexican boys
  • 211 et seq.
      • with other chiefs demands restitution for killing Apache by Boundary Commission Survey teamster
  • 218 et seq.
      • steals stock of Boundary Commission Survey and defies Americans
  • 227 et seq.
      • shooting of by Wells, member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 229
      • killing of two years later by Mexican
  • 230
    • DERBY, LIEUT.—Known as "John Phoenix," reaches Colorado in schooner "Invincible"
  • 251
    • DIAS, MARIANNA—Early Spanish resident of Tucson
  • 348
      • description of "Ancient Tucson"
  • 348 et seq.
    • DIAZ, JUAN—Early Spanish resident of Tucson
  • 349
    • DIAZ, CAPT. MELCHIOR—Sent in advance of Coronado's expedition
  • 17
      • sent to Village of the Hearts
  • 19
      • sent in search of Alarcon
  • 20
      • discovers Grand Canyon of Colorado
  • 20
      • death of
  • 21
    • DIAZ, PADRE—Companion of Padre Garces; killed by Yumas
  • 72 et seq.
    • DODSON—Renders aid to members of party organized at Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 341 342
    • DONIPHAN, COLONEL ALEX.—Commands regiment of volunteers in Mexican campaign
  • 129
      • prepares code of laws for New Mexico
  • 133
      • sent to capture Chihuahua
  • 134
      • makes expedition against Navajos
  • 306
    • DORANTES, ANDRES—Companion of Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca
  • 1 et seq.
    • DOUGLASS—One of first owners of Patagonia Mine
  • 292
    • DRAKE, SIR FRANCIS—Mention of
  • 120 126
    • DUEL—Col. Ed. Cross and Sylvester Mowry fight bloodless
  • 352
    • DUNBAR, E. E.—Director of Arizona Mining & Trading Co.
  • 278
    • DUNN, THOMAS—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • DURAN, PADRE—With other padres deserts Oñate
  • 37
    • EDWARDS, GOV.—Of Missouri, calls for volunteers for Mexican campaign
  • 129130
    • EHRENBERG, HERMAN—Forms Sonora Exploring & Mining Co.
  • 279
      • becomes its engineer
  • 280
    • EL MORO—Inscription Rock
  • 6
    • EL PASO DEL NORTE—First mention of
  • 4
      • Oñate reaches
  • 39
      • mention of by Lieut. Pike
  • 83
    • EL TUPO—Passed through by Father Kino
  • 58
    • EMORY, MAJ. W. H.—Succeeds John R. Bartlett as Boundary Survey Commissioner and completes survey
  • 187
    • ENGLAND—Treaty with of 1846
  • 120
    • ESCOBAR, PADRE—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 48
    • ESPEJO, ANTONIO DE—Organizes expedition to search for three Franciscan Fathers
  • 28
      • route of
  • 28 et seq.
      • discovers mines in Arizona
  • 29
    • ESPELETA, JOSE—Franciscan Father in charge of Agustin de Santa Maria
  • 55
    • ESQUIVEL, FRANCISCO DE—Appointed comisario for visita-general to Oñate's camp
  • 35
    • ESTEVAN—Negro slave owned by Andres Dorantes, companion of Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca
  • 1 et seq.
      • accompanies Fray Marcos de Niza
  • 8 et seq.
      • sent in advance of expedition
  • 11
      • disobeys instructions
  • 11
      • killing of
  • 12
    • EXPLORATIONS AND EXPLORERS—Early
  • 80 et seq.
      • Lieut. Zebulon M. Pike
  • 81 et seq.
      • Capt. Becknell
  • 88
      • Col. Cooper
  • 88
      • Col. Marmaduke
  • 89
      • Jedediah Smith
  • 94 98
      • The Patties
  • 94
      • Bill Williams
  • 94 102
      • Felix Aubrey
  • 94 99
      • Pauline Weaver
  • 94
      • Kit Carson
  • 94
      • William Wolfskill
  • 99
    • EXPLORATIONS AND SURVEYS—Boundary Commission Survey
  • 183 et seq.
      • reconnaissance by Capt. L. Sitgreaves
  • 264
      • appropriations by Congress for
  • 265
      • survey by Lieut. A. W. Whipple
  • 265
      • reconnaissance by Lieut. J. G. Parke
  • 269
      • exploration and survey by Lieut. J. G. Parke
  • 269
    • EXPLORATIONS FOR WAGON ROADS—Felix Aubrey
  • 353
      • Lieut. E. F. Beale
  • 356 et seq.
    • EWELL, CAPT.—With First Dragoons arrives in Santa Cruz Valley
  • 288
      • one of first owners of Patagonia Mine
  • 292
    • FARFAN, CAPT.—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 38
    • FERRY—First across Colorado River
  • 234
      • others
  • 235 et seq.
    • FIGUEROA, JOSE—Franciscan Father, in charge of mission of San Bernardino de Aguatuvi
  • 55
    • FITZGERALD—Mention of
  • 107
    • FLAG—American flag raised at Tucson by United States Dragoons
  • 344
      • W. H. Kirkland said to have raised first American flag at Tucson
  • 345
    • FLOURING MILL—First in Territory, established by Solomon Warner
  • 346
    • FORBES—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 332
    • FOULKE—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 331
    • FRANCE—Working in California for annexation of that Territory
  • 151
    • FRANCISCAN ORDER—Ten Franciscans accompany Oñate
  • 38
      • Franciscans in Arizona
  • 67 70
      • Franciscans in California
  • 120 et seq.
    • FRANCISCO—Friendly Indian, rescues Olive Oatman from captivity
  • 261
      • death of
  • 262
    • FREMONT, JOHN C.—Mention of
  • 105
      • meeting with Kit Carson
  • 107
      • with command returns to California and drives Mexicans south
  • 123
      • succeeds John B. Weller as Boundary Commissioner and is in turn succeeded by John R. Bartlett
  • 183
    • FRENCH ATTACHE—M. Duflot de Mofras, explores California
  • 151
    • FRONTERAS, PRESIDIO OF—Ordered changed
  • 68
    • GADSDEN, JAMES—United States Minister to Mexico for purpose of purchasing territory
  • 189
    • GADSDEN PURCHASE—Cession of territory under to United States
  • 186
      • history of
  • 188 et seq.
      • text of treaty
  • 190 et seq.
      • taken possession of by United States
  • 321
    • GADSONIA—One of names suggested for territory
  • 322
    • GALLATIN—See Glanton
    • GALLEGO, JUAN—Sent to New Spain by Coronado with message for the viceroy
  • 20
    • GALVESTON—Mention of
  • 1
    • GANDARA, DON MANUEL—Governor of Sonora, letter to from Lieut. Col. Cooke
  • 141 et seq.
    • GARCES, PADRE FRANCISCO—In charge of San Xavier del Bac; also engaged in northern explorations
  • 70
      • makes Tucson a walled town
  • 71
      • biography of
  • 72
      • in charge of San Xavier del Bac
  • 72
      • his pilgrimages
  • 72
      • visits Yumas
  • 72
      • founds presidio-pueblos-missions
  • 73
      • killed by Indians
  • 74
    • GARLAND, GENERAL—Succeeds Col. Summer in command of expedition against Navajos
  • 309
    • GARNER, GEORGE—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • GARNER, GEO. C.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • GICOMBO—Acoma chief
  • 46
    • GILA RIVER—Mention of
  • 8, 19
      • mouth of reached by Oñate
  • 49
      • reached by Father Kino
  • 59
      • reached by Father Ignacio Keller and Father Jacob Sedelmair
  • 61
      • discovery of gold placers on by Jacob Sniveley
  • 296
    • GILA VALLEY—Mention of
  • 65
      • visited by the Patties
  • 94
    • GILLESPIE, LIEUT. ARCHIBALD—Bearer of dispatches to Fremont and Consul Larkin
  • 123
    • GLANTON, JOHN—Assumes management of Colorado Ferry; murders Indians; extorts heavy toll from immigrants; massacre of with party by Indians
  • 235 et seq.
      • conflicting accounts
  • 236
    • GLENN, R. H.—One of first district attorneys of Arizona
  • 326
    • GONZALES, INEZ—Her capture by Indians and rescue by Boundary Commission Survey
  • 201 et seq.
      • her statement
  • 205
      • her restoration to her family
  • 207 et seq.
    • GORDON—Cook for Boundary Commission Survey, witnesses killing of Apache by teamster
  • 219
    • GRAND CANYON—Discovered by Melchior Diaz
  • 20
    • GRANITE CREEK—Placer mining on by Walker party
  • 298
    • GREEK GEORGE—Camel attendant
  • 357
      • death of
  • 364
    • GREEN, LIEUT. D. C.—Member of escort of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 203
    • GREEN, SENATOR—Introduces bill to make Arizona a territory
  • 326
    • GREEN—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 331
    • GRINNELL, HENRY—Aids Lorenzo Oatman in rescue of his sister
  • 259
    • GUADALUPE HIDALGO, TREATY OF—History of
  • 149 et seq.
      • passed by Senate and ratified
  • 153
      • text of
  • 154 et seq.
      • protocol to
  • 176 et seq.
      • boundaries, area and cost of cession under
  • 180 et seq.
      • delivery of cession
  • 182
      • Boundary Commission Survey under not permanently established
  • 186
    • GUALPI—Early Spanish mission at
  • 55
    • GUERRA, JUAN—Friend of Oñate and bears portion of expense of expedition
  • 36
    • GUEVAVI—First mission established in Arizona by Father Kino
  • 57
      • in charge of Father Juan Baptista Grasshoffer
  • 61
      • Father Jose Carucho at
  • 61
      • plundered by Indians and abandoned
  • 62
      • reoccupied
  • 62
      • mention of
  • 62–63
      • called San Miguel and San Rafael and also Santos Angeles; history of
  • 76
      • Padre Juan Crisostomo Gil de Bernave in charge of but killed by Indians
  • 76
      • has disappeared from modern maps
  • 76
    • GUIPUI—See Santo Domingo
    • GUZMAN, NUNO DE—President of New Spain
  • 14
      • organizes but abandons expedition
  • 15
    • GUZMAN—Viceroy of New Spain, cruel and avaricious
  • 8
    • GWIN, SENATOR—Introduces bill for organization of territory
  • 323
      • same fails of passage
  • 324
    • HART—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 332
    • HARTLEY, MAJOR—Director in Sonora Exploring & Mining Company
  • 280
    • HATCH, CAPTAIN JOHN P.—Commands expedition against Navajos
  • 314
    • HAWAIKUH—Mention of
  • 13
    • HAY—Head miner at Copper Mines lends assistance to Boundary Commission Survey in matter of stolen stock
  • 228
    • HAYDEN—Renders aid to members of party organized at Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 342
    • HAYWARD, CHARLES—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • HEARTS, VILLAGE OF THE—See Corazones
    • HEERMAN, DR. A. L.—Member of Lieut. Parke's surveying party
  • 269
    • HEINTZELMAN, COL.—Establishes military post at Colorado ferry
  • 237
      • subdues Yumas
  • 250251
      • President of Sonora Exploring & Mining Co.
  • 280
    • HEINTZELMAN MINE—Discovered
  • 287
      • first shipment of ore from
  • 288
      • first mining machinery brought into Arizona used at
  • 289
      • description of by Sylvester Mowry
  • 289 et seq.
    • HEYDENFELD, JUDGE—One of organizers of Crabb expedition into Mexico
  • 330
    • HI JOLLY—Camel attendant
  • 357
      • death of
  • 364
    • HONORATO, FRA—Companion of Marcos de Niza
  • 8 et seq.
      • falls sick and is left behind
  • 10
    • HOUGHTON, JOAB—One of first American judges in New Mexico
  • 133
    • HOUSTON, THEODORE—Killed by Indians
  • 276
    • HOWARD, GILA—First American child born in Arizona; born on flat boat on Gila River
  • 234
    • HUBBELL, SANTIAGO—Brings train of supplies to Heintzelman Mine and takes out first shipment of ore
  • 288
    • HUGHES, SAMUEL—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • HUTTON, N. H.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
      • member of Lieut. Parke's second expedition
  • 269
    • ILLARREGUI, JOSE SALAZAR—Also spelled Yllarregui; appointed commissioner by Mexico to arrange details for sale of territory to United States
  • 190 et seq.
    • IMMACULATE CONCEPTION—Mission of
  • 57
    • IMMIGRATION—Of Mexicans into California
  • 121
    • IMMIGRATION—Into California over Southern route
  • 234
    • INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI—Starting point for Santa Fe trade,
  • 80 et seq.
    • INDIANS—See different tribes, Pimas, Maricopas, Apaches, Yumas, Navajos, etc.
    • INDIGO, DON FERNANDO—Cause of Crabb expedition into Mexico
  • 332
    • IRRIGATION—In Rio Grande Valley
  • 82
    • IVES, LIEUT. J. C.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's surveying party
  • 266
    • JACKSON, PRESIDENT—Proposes to Mexico to purchase certain Mexican territory
  • 150
    • JAEGER, L. J. F.—And Hartshorne establish ferry across Colorado
  • 236
      • Jaeger attacked by Indians
  • 237
      • sale of lots in Yuma to
  • 352
    • JESUITS—In Arizona. Father Kino
  • 57 et seq.
      • Father Felipe Segesser
  • 61
      • Father Juan Baptista Grasshoffer
  • 61
      • Father Caspar Steiger
  • 61
      • Father Jose Carucho
  • 61
      • Father Francisco Paver
  • 61
      • Father Ignacio Keller
  • 61
      • Father Jacob Sedelmair
  • 61
      • Father Alonzo Espinosa
  • 62
      • Father Ignacio Pfefferkorn
  • 62
      • Father Jimino
  • 62
      • Father Pedro Rafael Diaz
  • 62
      • expulsion of Jesuits from Mexico, and Arizona
  • 6266
      • property confiscated
  • 636466
      • did not work mines
  • 66
      • causes leading to expulsion
  • 66
    • JIM—Negro boy at Fort Defiance killed by Navajo
  • 311
    • JOHNSON, CAPT. GEO. A.—In schooner "Sierra Nevada" reaches mouth of Colorado
  • 252
    • JOHNSON—Massacre of Indians
  • 117
      • one of first owners of Patagonia mine
  • 292
    • JONES, CAPT. J. N.—In command of escort for Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • JOSTA, FRANCISCO—Governor of Pueblo of Jemez, accompanies Col. Washington in expedition against Navajos
  • 307
    • JOUGOPA VI, SAN BARTOLOME DE—Early Spanish mission
  • 55
    • JUDICIAL DISTRICTS—Created by constitutional convention at Tucson
  • 325
    • KEARNY, GENL. STEPHEN W.—Takes command of Army of West for invasion of Mexico
  • 129
      • Army leaves Bent's Fort for Mexico
  • 130 131
      • makes speeches from housetops to Mexicans
  • 132
      • his instructions from the Secretary of War
  • 132
      • occupies all principal towns of New Mexico and organizes civil government
  • 133
      • arranges campaign and commences march to California
  • 134
      • meets Kit Carson and receives news of conquest of California
  • 134
      • persuades Carson to act as guide for his command
  • 134 135
      • his route
  • 135
      • instructs Lieut.-Col. Cooke to open wagon-road to the Pacific
  • 135
      • meets Apaches and trades mules with Mangus Colorado
  • 135
      • also meets Pimas
  • 135
      • occupation of New Mexico
  • 135 et seq.
      • begins unfriendly relations with Navajos
  • 306
    • KENDRICK, JAMES—Killed by Indians
  • 276
    • KENDRICK, MAJOR—Tricked by Navajos
  • 310
    • KENNERLEY, DR. C. B. R.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • KENT, DR.—In company with Bill Williams when both killed by Utes
  • 105
    • KERN, R. H.—Member of Capt. Sitgreaves' exploring party
  • 264
    • KIBBERS, G.—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • KINO, FATHER EUSEBIO FRANCISCO—Works among Indians and founds missions in Arizona
  • 56 et seq.
      • travels with Father Juan de Salvatierra
  • 57
      • enters Pimeria Alta
  • 58
      • visits Santa Maria Magdalena and other missions, is met by delegation of Sobaipuris begging for padres
  • 58
      • makes second entrada into Arizona
  • 59
      • says mass in Casas Grandes being first white man to visit them
  • 59
      • makes first formal expedition into Arizona, accompanied by Father Mange
  • 59
      • unites with military expedition at Quiburi (near Tombstone)
  • 59
      • joined by Sobaipuris
  • 59
      • march down San Pedro River to the Gila
  • 59
      • again visits Casas Grandes
  • 59
      • march up Santa Cruz River
  • 59
      • return to Mexico
  • 60
      • again visits Arizona and lays foundation of church at San Xavier del Bac
  • 60
      • travels from Sonoita to Gila and Colorado and visits Yumas
  • 60
      • last visit to Arizona
  • 60
    • KIRKLAND, WM. H.—Early resident of Tucson; raised first American flag in Tucson
  • 345
      • first white man to marry white woman in Arizona
  • 345
    • LANGDON, DR.—Establishes ferry across Colorado
  • 235
    • LAJEUNESSE, BASIL—One of Fremont's guides
  • 108
    • LANE, GOVERNOR—Succeeded by Gov. Meriwether
  • 309
    • LA PAZ—Gold placers at, discovered by Pauline Weaver
  • 297
    • LARGO, JOSE—Navajo Chief
  • 307
    • LARGO, SARCILLO—Navajo Chief, resigns because Navajos would not obey him
  • 310
    • LARKIN—Consul at Monterey receives dispatches from Government
  • 123
    • LAS VEGAS—Reached by Genl. Kearny
  • 131
    • LAWS AND CODES OF NEW MEXICO—Adopted by constitutional convention at Tucson
  • 325
    • LEAVENWORTH, FORT—Genl. Kearny's army leaves
  • 130
    • LEITZENDORFER, EUGENE—First American auditor in New Mexico
  • 133
    • LEON, PEDRO PONCE DE—Opposes Oñate
  • 35
    • LEROUX—One of guides of Mormon Battalion
  • 138
    • LIMON, ENSIGN—In command of escort of Inez Gonzales when she was captured by Indians
  • 205
    • LINDSAY, CAPT.—Makes successful attack upon Navajos
  • 316317
    • LOPEZ, JESUS—Boundary Commission Survey teamster who killed Apache and his punishment
  • 218 et seq.
    • LOPEZ—Priest murdered by Indians
  • 40
    • LORD, DR. C. H.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • LORELES, EPUMUSEMA—Early Spanish resident of Tucson
  • 349
    • LUCAS, JAMES A.—First Secretary of State of Arizona
  • 325
    • LUCERO, CAPT. BLAS—With company of Mexicans co-operate with Indian Agent Yost in campaign against Navajos
  • 312 et seq.
    • LUCERO, JUAN—Navajo Chief, wishes hostilities stopped
  • 312
    • McDUFFLE, J. THOMAS—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • McELROY—Member of Arizona Mining and Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • McGOWAN, EDWARD—One of first judges of District Court of Arizona
  • 326
      • elected as Delegate to Congress in place of Sylvester Mowry
  • 326
    • McKNIGHT—Early trader over Santa Fe trail
  • 87
    • McLANE, CAPT.—Commands military in Indian Agent Yost's campaign against Navajos
  • 312 et seq.
    • MAGOFFIN, AMBASSADOR JAMES—Sent on secret mission to Mexico
  • 130 et seq.
    • MALDONADO, ALONZO DEL CASTILLO—Companion of Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca
  • 1 et seq.
      • develops healing powers
  • 2 et seq.
    • MANGUS COLORADO—Meets Genl. Kearny and trades mules
  • 135
      • argument against Boundary Commission Survey taking away Mexican captive boys
  • 211 et seq.
      • with other Apache chiefs demands restitution for killing of Apache by Boundary Commission Survey teamster
  • 218 et seq.
      • history of
  • 230 et seq.
      • married to Mexican girl
  • 231
      • marries daughters to chiefs of other tribes
  • 231
      • personal description
  • 232
    • MAP OF ARIZONA—Made by Sylvester Mowry, dividing Arizona into four counties, Castle Dome, Ewell, Mesilla and Donna Ana
  • 324
    • MARBLE, JOHN H.—Killed by Indians
  • 276
    • MARCOU, JULES—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • MARICOPAS—Mormon Battalion camps at villages of—Lieut.-Col. Cooke's description of
  • 145
      • number
  • 146
      • attacked by Yumas and Mohaves, with aid of Pimas and Papagos conquer attacking party
  • 262
    • MARMADUKE, COLONEL—Early trader over Santa Fe trail
  • 89
    • MARQUEZ, PADRE—Leaves Oñate
  • 38
    • MARQUIS, ISLE OF THE—Early name for California
  • 21
    • MARTIN, ROMANO—Killed by Navajos
  • 309
    • MARTINEZ PADRE ALONZO—With ten Franciscans joins Oñate's expedition
  • 38
    • MARTINEZ, MARIANO—Navajo Chief
  • 307
    • MASON, FORT—Mention of
  • 58
    • MASTIN, THOMAS J.—One of first District Attorneys of Arizona
  • 326
    • MATAMORAS—Mention of
  • 127
    • MATTHEWS, ROBT. E.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • MAXWELL, LUCIEN B.—Partner of Kit Carson
  • 112
    • MAYOS—Mention of
  • 10
    • MENDOZA, ANA DE—Wife of Juan Guerra, gives assistance to Oñate
  • 38
    • MENDOZA, ANTONIO DE—Spanish viceroy
  • 8
      • policy towards Indians one of friendliness
  • 8
      • sends Marcos de Niza and Estevan to explore northern country and Seven Cities of Cibola
  • 8
    • MERIWETHER, GOVERNOR—Succeeds Gov. Lane
  • 309
      • makes treaty with Navajos
  • 310
    • METAPA—Mention of
  • 11
    • MEXICAN WAR—Genl. Zachary Taylor warned by Genl. Ampudia to retire from banks of Rio Grande
  • 128
      • advised by Genl. Arista that hostilities were considered commenced
  • 128
      • American Dragoons attacked by Mexicans
  • 128
      • war declared with Mexico
  • 129
    • MEXICO—War with
  • 127 et seq.
      • President Jackson proposes to purchase certain portions of
  • 150
      • offers made by Secretary of State Buchanan
  • 152
      • Nicholas Trist, U. S. Commissioner to Mexico, appointed by President Polk, fails to make treaty
  • 152
      • finally succeeds
  • 153
      • Miguel Atristain, Luis G. Cuevas, and Bernardo Couto, Mexican Commissioner
  • 153
      • treaty done at Guadalupe Hidalgo
  • 153
      • adopted by Senate and ratified at Queretaro
  • 153
      • protocol signed by American Commissioners and by Mexican Minister of Foreign Affairs, Luis de la Rosa
  • 178
      • Mexican Commissioner for Boundary Survey, Genl. Pedro Garcia Conde
  • 183
    • MEYER, C. H.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • MICHLER, LIEUT. N.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 188
    • MILES, COLONEL—Arrives and takes command of troops in campaign against Navajos
  • 312
      • again enters fight against Navajos
  • 316
      • subjugates Navajos
  • 318
    • MILITARY ANNALS—Garrisons increased and Opata allies organized
  • 68
      • Tubac again made presidio and Pima allies organized
  • 69
      • military organization effective to 1811
  • 77
      • First Dragoons arrive in Santa Cruz valley and establish Fort Buchanan
  • 321
      • withdrawal of troops from Arizona causes abandonment of mines and destruction of same by Indians and Mexicans
  • 291
    • MILITARY GOVERNMENT OF NEW MEXICO—Description of by Lieut Pike
  • 85
      • protection to Santa Fe traders
  • 89
    • MINES AND MINING—First mines discovered by Espejo
  • 29
      • also by Oñate
  • 43
      • Santa Rita Copper Mine
  • 94 116 117 et seq.
      • gold mines discovered near camp of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 227
      • explorations for mines
  • 277
      • Arizona Mining & Trading Company organized, and exploring party sent out—take possession of Ajo Copper Mine and work same—ordered out of country by Mexicans
  • 278 et seq.
      • mines near Tucson and San Xavier del Bac worked
  • 279
      • Sonora Exploring & Mining Company formed—makes headquarters at Tubacand works mines in vicinity
  • 279 et seq.
      • Heintzelman Mine discovered
  • 287
      • first shipment of ore from Heintzelman Mine
  • 288
      • first mining machinery brought into Arizona used at Heintzelman Mine
  • 289
      • mining camps and towns abandoned by miners and destroyed by Indians and Mexicans when troops withdrawn from Arizona
  • 291
      • Patagonia, afterwards Mowry, Mine discovered—confiscated by Genl. Carleton and owner arrested
  • 292 et seq.
      • discovery of gold placers on Gila by Jacob Sniveley—description of by Sylvester Mowry
  • 296
      • discovery of gold placers at La Paz by Pauline Weaver
  • 297
      • Weaver Diggings and Weaver Creek discovered by Pauline Weaver, Peeples and Jack Swilling
  • 297
      • arrival of Walker party and discovery of placers on Granite Creek by
  • 298
      • Turkey Creek and Big Bug
  • 298
      • Henry Wickenburg discovers Vulture Mine
  • 298
    • MOHAVE, FORT—Establishment of
  • 322
    • MOHAVES—Visited by Oñate
  • 49
      • purchase Olive Oatman from Tonto Apaches
  • 258
      • with Yumas go on warpath against Maricopas
  • 262
    • MOHLHAUSEN, H. B.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • MOHOQUI—Oñate visits
  • 43
    • MONTERDE, GENL. MARIANO—Appointed commissioner by Mexico to arrange details for sale of territory to United States
  • 190 et seq.
    • MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA—Taken by Commodore Sloat
  • 123 et seq.
    • MONTEREY, COUNT OF—Succeeds Velasco as Viceroy and creates delays for Oñate
  • 34 et seq.
    • MONTGOMERY, CAPT. JOHN B.—Under orders from Commodore Sloat takes possession of San Francisco for the United States
  • 126
    • MONTOYA, PABLO—One of leaders of insurrection in New Mexico
  • 148
    • MOQUIS—Prolificity of
  • 29
      • first natives of Arizona to submit to Spanish authority
  • 51
      • houses and dress—their country and customs
  • 51 et seq.
      • Bishop Salpointe's description of
  • 53 et seq.
      • restoration of sight to blind Moqui
  • 54
      • work of the priests among
  • 55
      • repudiate Spanish and Christian control, and maintain independence
  • 55
      • give protection to other tribes
  • 55
    • MOQUI VILLAGES—Visited by Espejo
  • 28
      • visited by Oñate
  • 48
    • MORENO, PADRE—Killed by Yumas
  • 74
    • MORMON BATTALION—Mention of
  • 130
      • reaches Santa Fe commanded by Lieut. A. J. Smith—condition of
  • 136
      • under command of Lieut.-Col. P. St. Geo. Cooke commences march to Pacific
  • 137 138
      • route and guides—adventure with wild cattle
  • 138 et seq.
      • meet with Mexicans soldiers and visit Tucson
  • 140
      • camp visited by Pimas
  • 143
      • camp at villages of Maricopas
  • 145
      • reach and cross Colorado
  • 146
    • MORMONS—Supposed to have furnished Navajos with firearms
  • 315
      • try to incite general uprising of Indians and furnish arms and ammunition to them
  • 315
    • MOSS, THEODORE—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • MOWRY MINE—First named "Patagonia"
  • 292
      • discovery of
  • 292
      • confiscated by Genl. Carleton
  • 293
    • MOWRY, SYLVESTER—Description of Heintzelman Mine by
  • 289 et seq.
      • becomes owner of Patagonia Mine and renames it
  • 293
      • arrested by Genl. Carleton and property confiscated
  • 293
      • Mowry's side of the story
  • 294
      • description of gold placers on Gila by
  • 296
      • chosen Delegate to Congress
  • 324
      • publishes map of Arizona
  • 324
      • again chosen Delegate to Congress
  • 325
      • early resident of Tucson
  • 345
      • fights bloodless duel with Col. Ed. Cross
  • 352
    • MURPHY, ROBT. C.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • MUTUTICACHI—Mention of
  • 11
    • NARBONA—Navajo chief
  • 307
    • NARVAEZ—Expedition
  • 1 et seq.
    • NAVAJOS—Description of, crops, dress, customs, occupations, etc.
  • 300 et seq.
      • unfriendly relations with whites begin with occupation of New Mexico by Genl. Kearny
  • 306
      • raids by
  • 306 et seq.
      • expeditions against by Col. Doniphan, Major Walker, Col. Newby and Col. J. M. Washington
  • 306 et seq.
      • raids by and treachery of
  • 307
      • Col. Sumner and Governor Calhoun make treaty with
  • 308
      • Col. Sumner marches against them
  • 308
      • kill Romano Martin and soldier at Fort Defiance
  • 309 310
      • restitution demanded by Maj. Kendrick and trickery of Navajos
  • 310
      • Navajo has trouble with wife and kills negro boy at Fort Defiance—campaign against tribe results—Col. Miles arrives and takes command
  • 311 et seq.
      • campaign against by Capt. John P. Hatch
  • 314
      • Navajos supplied with firearms, supposedly by Mormons
  • 315
      • Col. Miles again enters field against them
  • 316
      • Capt. Lindsay makes successful attack
  • 316
      • subjugation of
  • 318
    • NAVIGATION—Capt. Wilcox in schooner "Invincible" reaches mouth of Colorado
  • 251
      • Capt. Geo. A. Johnson in schooner "Sierra Nevada" reaches mouth of Colorado
  • 252
      • Capt. Turnbull brings first steamer "Uncle Sam" to Colorado River
  • 252
      • other vessels
  • 252
    • NEBRASKA—Oñate makes expedition into
  • 31
    • NEWBY, COL.—Makes expedition against Navajos
  • 307
    • NEW MEXICO—First mention of
  • 4
      • description of by Lieut. Pike
  • 81 et seq.
      • all principal towns of, occupied by General Kearny
  • 133
      • civil government established and code of laws adopted by
  • 133
      • permanent territorial organization established
  • 133
      • revolt of natives and massacre of American officials
  • 147
      • revolt put down by Col. Price
  • 147
      • leaders of revolt and their fates
  • 148
      • submission of New Mexico
  • 148
    • NEWSPAPER—"Arizonian," the first published in Arizona, published by Col. Ed. Price at Tubac
  • 352
    • NIZA, FRAY MARCOS DE—First mention of
  • 7
      • sent by Viceroy Antonio de Mendoza to explore northern country and Seven Cities of Cibola
  • 8
      • his instructions
  • 8 et seq.
      • his journey
  • 10 et seq.
      • reports on country and inhabitants
  • 13
      • expedition organized
  • 15–16
      • glowing reports made by
  • 15–16
      • sent back from Galicia by Coronado
  • 19
    • NORTE, RIO DEL—Mention of
  • 82
    • NUECES, RIVER—Mention of
  • 128
    • NUESTRA SENORA DE LOS DOLORES—Early mission established by Father Kino
  • 56
    • NUEVA SEVILLE—Pueblo visited by Oñate
  • 40
    • OATMAN MASSACRE—Royce Oatman and party killed with exception of Olive and Mary Ann captured and Lorenzo escaped
  • 258
      • death of Mary Ann
  • 258
      • efforts of Lorenzo to effect rescue of his sisters
  • 258 et seq.
      • aided by Henry Grinnell
  • 259
      • Olive rescued by Francisco, friendly Indian
  • 261
      • death of Olive Oatman
  • 262
    • OCHOA, ESTEVAN—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • OCHOAVILLE—Mention of
  • 11
    • OCONOR, INSPECTOR HUGO—Orders presidio of Tubac transferred to Tucson
  • 74
    • OLD SPANISH TRAIL—Established by William Wolfskill
  • 99
    • ONATE, JUAN DE—Colonizer of New Mexico
  • 30
      • organizes expedition for colonization at own expense
  • 30
      • founds town of San Gabriel de los Españoles, second town in United States
  • 31
      • puts down revolt of Indians at Acoma
  • 31
      • makes entrada into Nebraska
  • 31
      • marches to Gulf of California and returns to San Gabriel
  • 31
      • founds Santa Fe (City of the Holy Faith of St. Francis)
  • 31
      • second expedition
  • 31
      • superseded by Pedro de Peralta
  • 31
      • his offers and demands
  • 32 et seq.
      • his disappointment at delay
  • 35 et seq.
      • start of expedition
  • 38
      • reaches Conchas
  • 38
      • Oñate a nepotist
  • 38
      • founds first church in New Mexico
  • 39
      • receives submission of Indians
  • 41 et seq.
      • visits Zuni and Mohoqui
  • 43
      • Captains Farfan and Quesada of expedition discover mines, salt and pearl oyster shells
  • 43
      • Zutucapan, Acoma chief, revolts against Oñate's men
  • 44
      • expedition sent against Acoma Indians
  • 45
      • destruction of pueblo of Acoma
  • 46
      • Oñate starts on western expedition
  • 48
      • visits Zuni, Moqui and crosses Colorado Chiquito and Rio Verde
  • 48
      • follows Bill Williams' Fork and Colorado River to tidewater—names port at mouth of Colorado, Puerto de la Conversion de San Pablo
  • 49
      • returns to Mexico—succeeded by Pedro de Peralta as Governor
  • 50
    • OPATAS—Mention of
  • 3 10
      • organized as allies by the Spaniards
  • 68
    • ORAIBE, SAN FRANCISCO DE—Early Spanish mission at
  • 55
    • ORANTIA, IGNACIO—First lieutenant-governor of Arizona
  • 325
    • ORTIZ, JESUS—Stepfather of Inez Gonzales
  • 210
    • ORTIZ—One of leaders of revolt against Americans in New Mexico
  • 148
    • OTERO, ANTONIO JOSE—One of first judges in New Mexico under American rule
  • 133
    • OURY, GRANVILLE H.—First chief justice of District Court of Arizona
  • 326
      • with Charles Tozer organizes expedition to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 329
      • early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • OURY, WILLIAM S.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • OWINGS, DR. L. S.—Chosen for governor at constitutional convention held at Tucson
  • 325
    • OXITIPAR, VALLEY OF—Mention of
  • 14
    • PACHECO, FRANCISCO—In company with Inez Gonzales when captured by Indians
  • 205
    • PACHECHO, YGNACIO—Early Spanish resident of Tucson
  • 349
    • PALMA—Yuma chief, embraces Christianity and induces Padre Garces to visit Yumas and establish missions
  • 72 et seq.
      • becomes disaffected and joins revolt of Yumas, resulting in death of Padre Garces and other priests
  • 73 et seq.
    • PALOMINAS—Mention of
  • 11
    • PAPAGOS—Make trouble
  • 69
      • assist Maricopas against Yumas and Mohaves
  • 262
    • PARKE, LIEUT. J. G.—Member of Capt. Sitgreaves' exploring party
  • 264
      • makes reconnaissance for railroad route between Pima Villages and El Paso
  • 269
      • makes second exploration and survey for railroad route from Benicia, California, to Fort Fillmore, New Mexico
  • 269 et seq.
    • PARKE, T. H.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • PASCUAL—Yuma chief, hostile to whites
  • 240
    • PATAGONIA MINE—See Mowry Mine
    • PATTIE, SYLVESTER AND JAMES—Early trappers and explorers—James supposed to be first white man to discover Black Canyon of Colorado; travels and adventures
  • 94 et seq.
    • PEDRO, PADRE—Early Spanish resident of Tucson
  • 349
    • PEEPLES—One of discoverers of Weaver Diggings and Weaver Creek
  • 297
    • PENALOSA, DONA EUFEMIA—Renders assistance to Oñate
  • 37
    • PENALOSA, GOVERNOR—Visits missions
  • 55
    • PENNINGTON FAMILY—Early residents of Tucson
  • 345
    • PESQUIERA, IGNACIO—Induces Henry A. Crabb to take Americans to Mexico to assist in revolt against Gandara—succeeds in revolt and massacres Crabb and party
  • 327 et seq.
    • PERALTA, PEDRO DE—Supersedes Juan de Oñate
  • 31 50
    • PERU—Mention of
  • 16
    • PETATLAN—Mention of
  • 10
    • PHILLIPS—Purchased interest in Vulture Mine from Henry Wickenburg
  • 299
    • PHOENIX, JOHN—See Lieut. Derby
    • PIERCE, GEO. S.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • PIERCE, PRESIDENT—Appoints Kit Carson Indian agent
  • 113
    • PIKE, LIEUT. ZEBULON M.—Breaks Santa Fe trail
  • 80 et seq.
    • PILOT KNOB—See Fort Defiance
    • PIMAS—First mention
  • 3
      • visited by Father Kino
  • 57
      • second revolt of
  • 62
      • allies of the Spanish
  • 69
      • make trouble
  • 69
      • organized as allies at presidio of Tubac
  • 75
      • meetings with Genl. Kearny
  • 135
      • honesty of
  • 143
      • visit Lieut-Col. Cooke's camp
  • 143
      • Juan Antonio, principal chief
  • 143
      • description of tribe by Lieut.-Col. Cooke
  • 144
      • assist Maricopas against Yumas and Mohaves
  • 262
    • PIMA VILLAGES—Mention of
  • 11 25
    • PIMERIA—One of names suggested for territory
  • 322
    • PINAL INDIANS—Capture and sell Inez Gonzales
  • 201 et seq.
      • description of
  • 206
    • PLANCHAS DE PLATA—Mention
  • 66
      • rediscovered by Arizona Mining & Trading Company
  • 278
    • POLK, PRESIDENT JAMES K.—Appoints Kit Carson, lieutenant in Rifle Corps
  • 111
      • one of first official acts notifying people of annexation of Texas
  • 120
      • orders army and navy to hold Texas
  • 151
      • commissions Nicholas P. Trist to treat with Mexico for territory
  • 152
      • appoints John B. Weller commissioner of Boundary Survey
  • 183
    • PONCE—Apache chief—arguments against Boundary Commission Survey taking away captive Mexican boys
  • 211 et seq.
      • with other chiefs demands restitution for killing of Apache by Boundary Survey teamster
  • 218 et seq.
    • PORRAS, FRAY FRANCISCO—Franciscan Father, poisoned by Indians
  • 55
    • PORTER, LIEUT. D. D.—Commissioned to purchase camels and bring them to United States
  • 354
    • PORTER—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • POSTON, CHARLES D.—Director in and manager of Sonora Exploring & Mining Company
  • 280
      • his description of life at Tubac
  • 281 et seq.
      • description of survey of town of Yuma
  • 319
      • early resident
  • 344
    • PRICE, COL. STERLING—Commands forces in Mexican campaign
  • 130
      • left in command of New Mexico
  • 147
      • puts down revolt of natives
  • 147
    • PRINTING-PRESS—First in territory used in printing the "Arizonian" at Tubac by Col. Ed. Cross
  • 352
    • PUEBLO VILLAGES—Mention of
  • 24
    • PUERTO DE LA CONVERSION DE SAN PABLO—Port on Gulf of California named by Oñate
  • 49
    • PUERTO DE LA PURISIMA CONCEPCION—Presidio-pueblo-mission established on Colorado by Padre Garces
  • 73
    • PUMPELLY, PROF. R.—Description of escape from Arizona when United States withdraw troops
  • 292
    • PURSLEY, JAMES—Resident of Santa Fe about 1806
  • 86
    • PURUAI—See San Antonio
    • QUALACU—Pueblo visited by Oñate
  • 40
    • QUIBURI—Point not far from Tombstone reached by Father Kino
  • 59
    • QUIBURI, RIO (SAN PEDRO RIVER)—Reached by Father Kino
  • 59
    • QUIVIRA—The Turk tells fabulous stories of to the Spanish
  • 24
    • REDONDO, JOSE M.—Investigates gold placers at La Paz
  • 297
    • REED—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 331
    • RILEY, MAJOR—Commands escort for Santa Fe caravan
  • 89
    • RIO BRAVO—Reached by Oñate
  • 39
    • RIO DEL FUERTE—Or Petatlan River
  • 11
    • RIO GRANDE—First mention of
  • 4
      • reached by Oñate
  • 31
  • 39
      • Genl. Zachary Taylor takes up position on banks of
  • 127
    • RIO GRANDE VALLEY—Irrigation in
  • 82
    • RIO PUERCOS—Mention of
  • 40
    • ROBINSON, VALENTINE—First Adjutant General of Arizona
  • 326
    • RODRIGUEZ—Priest murdered by Indians
  • 40
    • ROMERO, CAPTAIN—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 45
    • RONDSTADT, R.—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • ROSA, LUIS DE LA—Mexican Minister of Foreign Affairs, signs protocol to treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
  • 178
    • RUSSIANS—Establishment of at Bodega on coast of California—raise fort—withdraw military colony after United States acquires California
  • 150
    • ST. ANDREW—Mission of
  • 57
    • SAFFORD—Town of
  • 17
    • SALAZAR, JUAN FRIAS DE—Visitador to Oñate's camp
  • 37
    • SALAZAR, PADRE—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 40
    • SALVATIERRA, FATHER JUAN MARIA DE—Accompanies Father Kino
  • 57
    • SANDFORD, S. P.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • SANDOVAL, ANTONIO—Navajo Chief, accompanies Col. Washington in expedition against Navajos
  • 307
    • SANTIAGO—Yuma Chief, description of
  • 253
    • SANTIAGO—War cry of Spaniards
  • 18
    • SAN AGUSTIN DEL PUEBLITO DE TUCSON—See Tucson
    • SAN ANTONIO—Visited by Oñate's expedition
  • 40 43
    • SAN BUENAVENTURA, PADRE—Member of Kino's expedition
  • 48
    • SAN CAYETANO DE CALABAZAS—See Calabazas
    • SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA—Mention of
  • 120
    • SAN DIONISIO—Name given to Yuma rancheria by Father Kino
  • 60
    • SAN FRANCISCO—Oñate's intention to found city of
  • 42
    • SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA—Taken possession of by Capt. John B. Montgomery for United States under orders from Commodore Sloat
  • 126
    • SAN FRANCISCO MOUNTAINS—Mines near discovered by Espejo
  • 29
    • SAN GABRIEL—Established by Franciscans accompanying Oñate's expedition
  • 41
    • SAN GABRIEL DE LOS ESPANOLES—Second town in United States—founded by Juan de Oñate
  • 31
    • SAN IGNACIO SONOITA—See Sonoita
    • SAN JOSE—See Tumacacori
    • SAN JOSE—Where Oñate crossed the Colorado Chiquito
  • 48
    • SAN JUAN BAUTISTA—Pueblo visited by Oñate's expedition
  • 40
    • SAN JUAN DE LOS CABALLEROS—Now called "San Juan"
  • 41
      • visited by Oñate's expedition
  • 41
    • SAN MIGUEL DE GUEVAVI—See Guevavi
    • SAN MIGUEL DEL VALDO—Reached by Genl. Kearny
  • 131
    • SAN PEDRO RIVER—Mention of
  • 11
      • reached by Father Kino
  • 59
      • reached by Mormon Battalion
  • 139
    • SAN PEDRO Y SAN PABLO DE BICUNER—Presidio-pueblo-mission established on Colorado by Padre Garces
  • 73
    • SAN RAFAEL—See Guevavi
    • SAN XAVIER DEL BAC—Mention of
  • 57
      • founded and visited by Father Kino
  • 57 59
      • in charge of Father Felipe Segesser
  • 61
      • in charge of Father Gaspar Steiger
  • 61
      • Father Francisco Paver at
  • 61
      • plundered by Pimas and abandoned
  • 62
      • reoccupied
  • 62
      • mention of
  • 62 63
      • Padre Francisco Garces in charge
  • 70
      • mission destroyed by Apaches
  • 70
      • building of
  • 71
      • abandoned
  • 71
    • SANTA BARBARA—Mention of
  • 28
    • SANTA BARBARA MINES—Oñate's expedition reunited at
  • 37
    • SANTA CRUZ—See Terranate
    • SANTA FE—Founded by Oñate, called City of Holy Faith of St. Francis
  • 3150
      • description of by Lieut. Zebulon M. Pike
  • 81 et seq.
      • opening of trail and trade make Santa Fe mart for exchange for southwest
  • 88 et seq.
      • arrival of Ambassador Magoffin, and Lieut. Col. Cooke at
  • 130
    • SANTA FE TRAIL AND TRADE—Exploration by Lieut. Zebulon M. Pike
  • 80 et seq.
      • his description of the country
  • 81 et seq.
      • expedition by McKnight, Beard, Chambers and others
  • 87
      • Capt. Becknell makes trip to Santa Fe
  • 88
      • Col. Cooper also makes trip
  • 88
      • trade dates from 1822
  • 89
      • Col. Marmaduke engages in trade
  • 89
      • trouble with Indians and military protection
  • 89
      • arrival of caravan at Santa Fe
  • 90
      • duties
  • 91
      • establishment of stage route
  • 93
    • SANTA MARIA, AGUSTIN DE—Early Spanish mission
  • 55
    • SANTA MARIA MAGALENA PUEBLO—Visited by Father Kino
  • 58
    • SANTA MARIA RIVER—See Bill Williams' Fork
    • SANTA RITA COPPER MINES—Worked by the Patties
  • 94
      • massacre of Indians at by Johnson
  • 116 et seq.
      • reprisals by Indians
  • 117 et seq.
    • SANTOS ANGELES—See Guevavi
    • SANTO DOMINGO—Visited by Oñate's expedition
  • 41
    • SARIC—Mission of, visited by Father Kino
  • 58
    • SCOTT, GENL.—Mention of
  • 129
    • SEVEN CITIES OF CIBOLA—Mention of
  • 5 15 17
      • fight at
  • 18
    • SEVIER, AMBROSE H.—Commissioner to Mexico in matter of treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo
  • 153
    • SEYMOUR, ADMIRAL—In charge of British squadron in Pacific, reaches Monterey too late to prevent Commodore Sloat taking possession of California for the United States
  • 126
    • SHERBURNE, JOHN P.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • SIBILLETE—Mention of by Lieut. Pike
  • 85
    • SIMS, C. NEVILLE—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • SITGREAVES, CAPT. L.—Makes reconnaissance down Zuni and Colorado rivers
  • 264
    • SLATER—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 332
    • SLOAT, COMMODORE JOHN DRAKE—Commander of American squadron in Pacific, receives instructions from Secretary of Navy and takes possession of California for United States, hoisting flag at Monterey
  • 123 et seq.
      • orders Capt. John B. Montgomery to take possession of San Francisco
  • 126
    • SMITH, LIEUT. A. J.—In command of Mormon Battalion from Fort Leavenworth to Santa Fe
  • 136
    • SMITH, JEDEDIAH—Early pioneer
  • 94
      • first white man to enter Arizona from north
  • 98
      • his travels and adventures
  • 98 et seq.
    • SMITH, REES—One of first District Attorneys in Arizona
  • 326
    • SMITH—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 332
    • SNIVELEY, JACOB—Discovers gold placers on Gila
  • 296
    • SOBAIPURIS, also SOBAHPURIS—Mention of
  • 57
      • beg for padre
  • 57 58
      • join Father Kino's expedition
  • 59
    • SOCORRO—Visited by Oñate
  • 40
    • SONOITA—Visited by Father Kino
  • 60
      • revolt of Pimas at
  • 62
      • also called San Ignacio Sonoita and Sonoitac
  • 76
    • SONORA EXPLORING & MINING CO.—Formation of by Herman Ehrenberg, Samuel Colt, William T. Coleman, Chas. D. Poston and Major Hartley
  • 279 et seq.
      • Maj. Heintzelman, President
  • 280
      • receives $100,000 from Texas & Pacific Railroad
  • 280
      • takes up headquarters at Tubac and works mines in vicinity
  • 280
      • Heinzelman mine discovered and worked
  • 287
      • bring first mining machinery into Arizona for Heintzelman mine
  • 289
    • SOSO, RITA—Early Spanish resident of Tucson
  • 349
    • SPANIARDS—First colonizers of California
  • 120
    • SPANISH MISSIONS AND SETTLEMENTS—Extent of
  • 65 et seq.
      • nearest approach to prosperity
  • 69
      • list of
  • 70 et seq.
      • decline of
  • 78
    • STAGE LINE—Established between Independence, Missouri, and Santa Fe, over Santa Fe Trail
  • 93
    • STEIN, MAJOR—With First Dragoons arrives in Santa Cruz Valley
  • 288
    • STEIN, MAJOR—Commander of post at Calabasas
  • 331
    • STEVENS, HIRAM S.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • STEWART, JOHN B.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
      • captures teamster who killed Apache
  • 220
    • STONE, GENL.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • STONEMAN, GEORGE—Son of Lieut. (afterwards Genl.) Stoneman
  • 140
    • STONEMAN, LIEUT. (afterwards Genl.)—With Mormon Battalion
  • 140
      • commands escort for Lieut. Parke's surveying party
  • 269
    • STORE—First store in Tucson established by Solomon Warner
  • 346
    • SUAMCA, SANTA MARIA DE—Visited by Father Kino
  • 58
    • SUBLETTES, THE—Mention of
  • 107
    • SUMNER, COLONEL—With Governor Calhoun makes treaty with Navajos
  • 308
      • marches against Navajos and builds Fort Defiance
  • 309
    • SUMNER, MAJOR EDWIN V.—Commands dragoons in invasion of Mexico
  • 129
    • SWILLING, J. W. (JACK)—One of discoverers of Weaver Diggings and Weaver Creek
  • 297
    • TABORA, CAPT.—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 45
    • TAFOYA—One of leaders of insurrection in New Mexico
  • 148
    • TAXCO—Mention of
  • 36
    • TAYLOR, GENL. ZACHARY—Takes up position on banks of Rio Grande
  • 127
      • notified by Genl. Ampudia to retire
  • 128
      • advised by Genl. Arista that hostilities considered commenced
  • 128
      • campaign against Mexico
  • 128 et seq.
    • TECOLOTE—Reached by Genl. Kearny
  • 131
    • TEHUAS—Taken care of by the Moquis
  • 55
    • TEIPANA—Pueblo visited by Oñate
  • 40
    • TEJO—Indian who made reports of rich country to Nuno de Guzman
  • 14
    • TERRANATE, PRESIDIO OF—Ordered changed
  • 68
    • TERRITORIAL ORGANIZATION—Efforts to effect—New Mexico memorializes Congress—names suggested, Pimeria, Gadsonia and Arizona—mass meeting held at Tucson, Nathan P. Cooke chosen delegate to Congress—President Buchanan recommends territorial government—Senator Gwin introduces bill—legislature of New Mexico passes resolution for
  • 322 et seq.
      • petition of different States and Territories for territorial government for Arizona
  • 324
      • election held at Tucson, Sylvester Mowry chosen delegate to Congress
  • 324
      • Congress again memorialized and Mowry again chosen delegate
  • 325
      • constitutional convention held in Tucson establishing provisional government and choosing for governor Dr. L. S. Owings—three judicial districts created
  • 325
      • appointments by Governor Owings
  • 3256
      • Edward McGowan elected to Congress in place of Sylvester Mowry
  • 326
      • Senator Green introduces bill for territorial government
  • 326
      • bill fails of passage
  • 326
    • TEXAS—Annexation of
  • 119 et seq.
      • area claimed by
  • 127
    • THOM, CAPT. G.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 188
    • THOMAS—Member of expedition formed in Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 331
    • THOMPSON, THOMAS—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • THURBER, GEORGE—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • TIDBALL, LIEUT. J. C.—Commands additional escort for Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 267
    • TIGUEX—Mention of
  • 24
    • TISON, RIO DEL—Firebrand River
  • 20
    • TITUS, COLONEL—One of first owners of Patagonia Mine
  • 292 et seq.
    • TOMAS—Interpreter for Oñate's expedition
  • 41
    • TOMAS—One of leaders of insurrection in New Mexico
  • 148
    • TONTONTIAC—Kingdom of
  • 13
    • TOUS—Mention of by Lieut. Pike
  • 85
    • TOVAR, PEDRO DE—Sent by Coronado to explore villages of Tusayan—fight with and subjugation of the natives
  • 21 et seq.
      • receives news of large river and returns to Coronado
  • 22
    • TOZER, CHARLES—With Grant Oury organizes expedition at Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 329 et seq.
    • TRINFAN, JOSE—Mexican boy captured by Apaches and rescued by Boundary Commission Survey
  • 211
    • TRIST, NICHOLAS—Commissioner to Mexico
  • 152
      • fails to make treaty with
  • 152
      • finally makes treaty
  • 153
    • TRUYILLO, JOSE—Franciscan Father in charge of mission of San Bartolome de Jougopavi
  • 55
    • TUBAC—Member of
  • 58 65
      • presidio of transferred to Tucson
  • 68 74
      • description of
  • 75
      • under command of Capt. Juan B. Anza
  • 74
      • settlers petition for restoration of presidio and same restored
  • 75
      • silver mine at worked
  • 76
      • rancheria of friendly Apaches at
  • 76
      • population in 1848
  • 233
      • Sonora Exploring & Mining Co. takes up headquarters at and works mines in vicinity—life at
  • 280 et seq.
      • first newspaper in territory printed at
  • 352
    • TUBUTAMA, SAN PEDRO Y SAN PABLO DE—Mission of
  • 58
    • TUCSON—First mention of
  • 11
      • rancheria of
  • 62
      • founding of
  • 63 66
      • presidio of Tubac transferred to
  • 68 74
      • church of brick built at
  • 70
      • Indians at
  • 70
      • description of in 1772
  • 71
      • made a walled town by Padre Garces
  • 71
      • date of founding
  • 71 74
      • Indians quartered in pueblo adjoining the presidio called San Agustin del Pueblito de Tucson
  • 74
      • population of
  • 75
      • reached by Mormon Battalion
  • 140
      • only permanent town in Northern Sonora at time of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 233
      • population and condition in 1848
  • 233
      • most populous town in Arizona
  • 322
      • mass meeting held at for organization of territory
  • 322 323
      • constitutional convention held at
  • 325
      • expedition organized at to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 329 et seq.
      • leading town of Arizona
  • 344
      • American flag raised at by United States Dragoons
  • 344
      • early days in and early residents of
  • 344 et seq.
      • a walled town
  • 346
      • date of founding
  • 346
      • ancient history of by Mariana Dias
  • 348 et seq.
    • TUCUBABIA—Visited by Father Kino
  • 58
    • TUMACACORI—Mission of
  • 57
      • visited by Father Kino
  • 58
      • history of
  • 76
      • attacked by Apaches
  • 76
      • also called San Jose
  • 76
      • Fray Narciso Gutierrez, Juan B. Estelrio, and Ramon Liberes in charge
  • 77
    • TURNBULL, CAPT.—Brings first steamer, "Uncle Sam," to Colorado River
  • 252
    • TURK, THE—Tells fabulous stories of Quivira to the Spaniards
  • 24
      • killing of
  • 25
    • TURKEY CREEK—Mining district worked by Walker party
  • 298
    • TUSAYAN—Province of Seven Villages
  • 21
    • TYLER, PRESIDENT—Last official act signing resolution of Congress for annexation of Texas
  • 119
    • UGARTE, GENERAL—Introduces changes in Indian policy
  • 69
    • ULLOA Y LEMOS, LOPE DE—Makes visita general to Oñate's camp
  • 35
    • UNCLE SAM—First steamer on Colorado river
  • 252
    • UNITED STATES COMMISSIONER FOR BOUNDARY COMMISSION SURVEY—John B. Weller, superseded by John C. Fremont, who in turn was superseded by John R. Bartlett
  • 183
    • URES—See Corazones
    • UTES—Kill Bill Williams and Dr. Kent
  • 105
    • VACA, ALVAR NUNEZ CABEZA DE—Journey of
  • 1 et seq.
      • develops healing powers
  • 2 et seq.
      • end of journey
  • 4
      • subsequent life
  • 5 et seq.
    • VACAPA—See Metapa
    • VALDEZ, JOSE FAUSTIN—One of trading party that purchased Inez Gonzales from Indians
  • 203
    • VARGAS, GOVERNOR—Moquis profess willingness to submit to
  • 55
    • VELARDE, JUAN—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 45
    • VELASCO—Viceroy—accepts offers and demands of Oñate
  • 33
    • VERDE RIVER—Discovered by Espejo
  • 29
      • crossed by Oñate
  • 48
    • VIGIL, DONACIANO—First American secretary of New Mexico
  • 133
      • murdered in revolt of natives
  • 147
    • VILLAGRA—Poet—historian of Oñate's expedition
  • 33
    • VULTURE MINE—Discovered by Henry Wickenburg
  • 298
    • WADSWORTH, GENL.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • WAGON ROADS—See "Explorations for"
    • WAGON ROUTE—Across Arizona laid out by Lieut.-Col. P. St. Geo. Cooke
  • 137 et seq.
    • WALKER, CAPT. J. C.—Informed by Pah-Utes that Mormons were inciting a rising of Indians and furnishing arms and ammunition
  • 315
    • WALKER PARTY—Arrives in Arizona and works placers on Granite Creek
  • 298
    • WALKER, MAJOR—Makes expedition against Navajos
  • 306
    • WARNER, SOLOMON—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
      • establishes first American store in Tucson
  • 346
      • establishes first flouring mill in territory
  • 346
    • WASHINGTON, COL. J. M.—Makes expedition against Navajos
  • 307
    • WAYNE, MAJ. HENRY C.—Commissioned to purchase camels and bring them to United States
  • 354
    • WEAVER DIGGINGS.—Discovered by Pauline Weaver, Peeples and Jack Swilling
  • 297
    • WEAVER, PAULINE—Mention of
  • 94
      • one of guides of Mormon Battalion
  • 138
      • discovers gold placers at La Paz
  • 297
      • one of discoverers of Weaver Diggings and Weaver Creek
  • 297
    • WEBB, DR. THOMAS H.—Secretary of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
      • experience with Indians after massacre of Glanton and band
  • 237 et seq.
    • WEBSTER, DR.—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • WEEMS, J. E.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • WELLER, JOHN B.—Appointed by President Polk United States Commissioner on Boundary Commission Survey
  • 183
      • superseded by J. C. Fremont
  • 183
    • WELLS, J. H.—First controller of territory
  • 325
    • WELLS—Member of Boundary Commission Survey; wounds Delgadito
  • 229
    • WHIPPLE, LIEUT. A. W.—In charge of engineers of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 183
      • description of Yumas
  • 253
      • makes exploration and survey over 35th parallel
  • 265 et seq.
    • WHITE, WM. JR.—Member of Lieut. Whipple's exploring party
  • 266
    • WICKENBURG, HENRY—Discovers Vulture Mine
  • 298
    • WILBUR, A. P.—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • WILCOX, CAPT.—In schooner "Invincible" reaches mouth of Colorado
  • 251
    • WILKINS—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 332
    • WILLIAMS, BILL.—Mention of
  • 94
      • gave name to Bill Williams' Mountain and Bill Williams' Fork—pilot for Fremont—history of and death
  • 102 et seq.
    • WILLIAMS, GEORGE—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • WILLIAMS, W. W.—Early resident of Tucson
  • 345
    • WILLOCK, LIEUT.-COL.—Commands forces in Mexican campaign
  • 130
    • WILSON, BENJ. D.—Survivor of band massacred by Apaches
  • 118
    • WILSON, J. D.—One of organizers of Arizona Mining & Trading Company
  • 278
    • WILSON—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 331
    • WIRTZ, DR. H. R.—Medical director for Arizona makes statement as to killing of bill Williams and Dr. Kent
  • 105
    • WOLFSKILL, WILLIAM—Establishes "Old Spanish Trail"
  • 99
    • WOLLASTON, JOHN—Wounded by Indians
  • 276
    • WOOD, SURGEON WM. MAXWELL—Goes to Mexico City and furnishes Commodore Sloat with information leading to taking of California for United States
  • 125
    • WOODHOUSE, DR. S. W.—Member of Capt. Sitgreaves' exploring party
  • 264
    • WOODS—Member of expedition from Tucson to join Henry A. Crabb in Mexico
  • 331
    • WORDSWORTH, W. C.—First Major-General of Arizona
  • 326
    • WRIGHT, A. S.—One of organizers of Arizona Mining & Trading Company
  • 278
    • YANCY, JOE—Member of Arizona Mining & Trading Company's exploring party
  • 278
    • YAQUIS—Mention of
  • 10
    • YOST—Indian Agent, conducts campaign against Navajos
  • 312 et seq.
    • YOUNG, CLEMENT—Member of Boundary Commission Survey
  • 184
    • YOUNG, EWING—Mention of
  • 107
    • YUMA—First called Colorado City, then Arizona City, establishment of
  • 252
      • survey of
  • 319 352
      • description of by C. D. Poston
  • 319 et seq.
      • dispute between California and Arizona over
  • 321
    • YUMA, FORT—First established
  • 237
    • YUMAS—Visited by Father Kino
  • 60
      • induce Padre Garces to visit their country and establish missions—revolt and kill priests
  • 72 et seq.
      • experience of Dr. Webb with
  • 237 et seq.
      • description of by Lieut. A. W. Whipple
  • 253
      • with Mohaves go on warpath against Maricopas
  • 262
    • ZACATECAS—Silver mines of
  • 27
    • ZAGUATO—Town of visited by Espejo
  • 29
    • ZALDIVARS—Relatives of Juan de Oñate and officers in his expedition
  • 34 et seq.
    • ZUBIA, CAPT.—Member of Oñate's expedition
  • 45
    • ZUNIGA, DON IGNACIO—Description of affairs in Pimeria Alta
  • 78
    • ZUNI RIVER—Capt. L. Sitgreaves makes reconnaissance down
  • 264
    • ZUNIS—First mention of
  • 13
    • ZUNI VILLAGES—Visited by Espejo
  • 28
      • visited by Oñate, 43
  • 48
    • ZUTANCALPO—Acoma chief
  • 46
    • ZUTUCAPAN—Acoma chief, heads revolt against Oñate's men
  • 44 et seq.
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