CHAPTER XXV. FROM CAMP APACHE, NORTHEAST—A LAND FULL OF INTEREST...


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FROM CAMP APACHE, NORTHEAST—A LAND FULL OF INTEREST—A GREAT AGRICULTURAL AND MINERAL BELT COMBINED.

FROM Camp Apaché one hundred and twenty-five miles in a northeasterly direction, lies the prehistoric land of the Moqui and Zuni of which we have spoken. The immense tract of land enroute, promises to be one of great interest at the opening of this region in the near future to all classes of travelers—tourist, emigrant, historian, philologist.

To the tourist, for the many rural phenomena which such a diversified country must naturally open up; to the emigrant farmer, for its fertility of lands and well watered valleys; and to the historian and philologist, for the races of beings and their languages, which have but recently attracted the attention of the world. This latter class or features of attraction is in embryo. It has simply dawned, to inflame the spark of inquisitiveness in man for a further knowledge of himself, and his connection with the races of men; and inspire


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him with as healthy a desire for investigation as ever possessed the brain of a Darwin.

For a distance of about seventy-five miles toward the Little Colorado which traverses Arizona in the northeast, there seems to be a country that will vie with any on the Pacific coast for attention from the farmer. It is along and through a series of valleys sloping from the many mountains of eastern Arizona and extending into New Mexico. These mountains extend in a north and southeasterly direction nearly the whole length of the State; and from my experience in the actual distance traveled, and from reports from pioneers and frontiersmen, I would conclude that the same favorable conditions characterized them throughout.

Cooling streams and shady rills where many a lively plumed Indian spears his Dolly Varden trout, beneath an inviting cluster of foliage or a hanging wall of rock, makes up the panorama. The country is dotted here and there, with numerous small valleys which form a charming contrast to the ‘‘deserts’’ of the western portion of the Territory. In riding along these natural garden spots, my mind was more than once taken back to the time when California herself was dead to the world, and when some were wont to discourage all her claims to merits and virtues, by a reference to the great deserts of the West. To our great trans-continental


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railroads it was said, ‘‘“Oh! you can't make it pay to build such a road to the coast, even if the State is all you claim for it; for look at the deserts you have to go through to get there. Good for nothing; worth nothing.”’’ The trouble to acquire, they thought, though the thing be good in itself, would not be worth the thing acquired. I claim that the valleys of just the San Francisco mountains, and those combined in the eastern third of the Territory would alone warrant the building of a railroad. It must come. And it will come shortly. Such articles as the one below, clipped from a periodical, seems to strengthen my assertions.

‘‘“A band of one hundred and fifty men arrived here yesterday from Boston and took the first train by the Pennsylvania Central road on their way to Arizona. At the base of the San Francisco Mountains they intend to establish a colony. Each man takes provisions for ninety days, and his personal outfit of tools and clothing to a total prescribed weight of three hundred pounds, transportation for which and for himself to the end of the long journey is furnished by the Arizona Colonization Company—a Boston concern—at a cost of $140 per man. At the end of the railroad the colonists are to be joined by the company's engineer, Mr. G. B. Maynadier, who went ahead about a week ago to provide transportation from that point Mr. Maynadier


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was the chief engineer of Henry Meigg's Andes railroad in Peru, and is said to be thoroughly acquainted with Arizona.’’

‘‘“The part of the country in which the proposed settlement is to be made is said to be very rich in the precious metals and at the same time very advantageous for agriculturists. A company is forming in San Francisco with a capital of $10,000,000, to work located mining claims on the west side of the mountain to which these colonists are going. Within about thirty days at least, eighty more men with the families of some of those who have already gone will go from Boston to join this New England Colony, whose organization was begun in August last by a company of which Judge O. W. Cozzens is President, J. M. Piper, Secretary, and S. C. Hunt, Treasurer.”’’

There is a gap between the western boundary of Kansas and the Colorado River, east and west and from the 41° of latitude down to the border of Mexico that the whole country should lend its aid to open up and bring before the people—not only of this country, but of those where their subjects are more oppressed. The land, in its very fatness, is gasping for an outlet, while the people are crying for an inlet. I have noticed that some of our greatest agricultural belts extend in an indirect line from northeast to southwest. Run from the middle of the State of Kansas,


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across Iowa up into northern Illinois and Wisconsin and see this theory verified. Strike out from the Gulf of California at Guymas, run northeast through eastern Arizona and New Mexico, up through Colorado, and northeast to the Black Hills, and you have as complete a system of rich agricultural and mineral lands most harmoniously alternated together as exists within the country's domain. Give the people the railroads which rightly belong to them.

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