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BIOGRAPHY

MORRIS KING "MO" UDALL, of Tucson, AZ, was born in St. Johns, AZ, on June 15, 1922. He is the grandson of David King Udall, a noted Mormon pioneer, the son of Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Levi S. Udall and Louise Lee Udall, and brother of former Congressman and Secretary of the Interior, Stewart Lee Udall.

He attended the public schools of St. Johns, AZ. He was awarded a J.D. degree from the University of Arizona in 1949 (president student body, 1947, cocaptain of basketball team).

He entered the U.S. Army as a private in 1942, and was discharged as a captain in the U.S. Air Force in 1946, having served with the Twentieth Air Force in the Pacific Theater.

He played professional basketball with the Denver Nuggets in the 1948-49 season. In 1980 his portrait was hung in the Basketball Hall of Fame, honoring his year of professional basketball.

He began the practice of law in Tucson, AZ, and served as the county attorney for Pima County, AZ from 1952 to 1954. He was a partner in the law firm of Udall & Udall from 1949 to 1961, and served as vice president of the Arizona State Bar Association in 1961. He lectured at the University of Arizona on labor law from 1956 to 1957.

During this period, he was the cofounder of the Bank of Tucson and the Catalina Savings and Loan Association, and he served as president of the Tucson YMCA in 1960.

Upon the resignation of his brother, Stewart, from the House of Representatives to serve as the Secretary of the Interior, Morris K. Udall was elected as a Democrat to the 87th Congress, by special election on May 2, 1961. He served in each succeeding Congress until his resignation from the 102d Congress on May 4, 1991.

Congressman Udall served as the chairman of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs from 1977 until 1991. The committee's hearing room has been named by his colleages as the "Morris K. Udall Room." He was the ranking member on the Committee of the Post Office and Civil Service, and also was the chairman of the Office of Technology Assessment, as well as a member of the Committee on Foreign Affairs.
 

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He was a candidate in the Democratic primaries for President in the 1976 national campaign. He was the keynote speaker at the Democratic National Convention in New York City in 1980. In 1992 a special tribute was given to Morris K. Udall by the Democratic Party at their national convention held in New York City.

He has received numerous awards and commendations from national and state organizations throughout his legislative career, and he has been selected repeatedly by the media and his colleagues as one of the most respected and effective Members of the U.S. Congress.

Among his many publishing credits, Morris K. Udall wrote "Arizona Law of Evidence," which was published by West Publishing Co. in 1960 and still is used today in the University of Arizona School of Law. He also wrote "Job of a Congressman," published by Bobbs-Merrill in 1966, and "Education of a Congressman," published by Bobbs-Merrill in 1972. His best-known work, "Too Funny To Be President," was published by Henry Holt in 1988.

Since 1983, Morris K. Udall has served as the honorary chairman of the American Parkinson's Disease Association. He is the father of six children and was previously married to the former Patricia Emery and the former Ella Royston. He presently is married to the former Norma Gilbert.
 

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The Honorable Morris K. Udall of Arizona and his bride, Norma Gilbert Udall, gather with their wedding party in the U.S. Capitol rotunda after marrying in the chapel of the House of Representatives on August 6, 1989. Pictured with the newlyweds are Chaplain of the House, Rev. James David Ford, the Speaker of the House and Mr. Udall's best man, the Honorable Thomas S. Foley of Washington, and Senator Dennis DeConcini of Arizona with his wife, Susan.
 
 

LIFE AND CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF HON. MORRIS K.
UDALL

[From the Arizona Republic]

JUNE 15, 1922

Born in St. Johns, AZ, to Levi Stewart and Louise Lee Udall. Morris was the fourth child in a pioneer Mormon family of three boys and three girls. His father became a chief justice of the Arizona Supreme Court, his mother was active in civic affairs and wrote a book, "Me and Mine," about the life of a Hopi woman.

1929

Loses his right eye after being cut with a knife while playing with another boy. An alcoholic physician botches treatment, causing an infection that almost causes young Udall to lose both eyes.

1931

Contracts a nearly fatal case of spinal meningitis.
 

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1938-40

Co-captain of the St. Johns High School Redskins basketball team. He also quarterbacks the football team, acts the lead in the school play, edits the yearbook, plays trumpet in the school band and serves as student body president and valedictorian.

During this time, Morris Udall develops a passion for politics, history and international affairs, and writes a column for the Apache County Independent News.

1940

Enters the University of Arizona on a basketball scholarship.

1942

Drafted and assigned to a limited service, noncombat support unit in Fort Douglas, UT, for those with physical handicaps. He is assigned to Lake Charles, LA, where he spent nearly 2 years.

With only 2 years of pre-law training, defends a black airman accused of killing a white guard while attempting to escape from a stockade. Six white officers sentence the man to death; he later writes, "The case still haunts me."

1945

Shipped to Iwo Jima, he arives on "D-Day plus 155" with a piano and sporting equipment to entertain troops.

1946

Receives an honorable discharge with the rank of captain. He returns to the University of Arizona.

1947-48

Student body president, cocaptain of a Border Conference championship basketball team and a full-time law student.

1949

Graduates with a bachelor of law degree from the University of Arizona with credits from the University of Denver, where he played professional basketball for the old Denver Nuggets.

He has the highest score on the State bar exam in 1949. That same year, he forms a law partnership with his brother, Stewart.

1950

Named chief deputy Pima County attorney.

1952

At age 30, is elected county attorney.

1954

Loses a bid for Superior Court judge.

1960

Publishes his first book, "Arizona Law of Evidence," still referred to as the Arizona trial lawyer's bible.
 

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1961

On May 2, wins a special election to Congress by a narrow margin over Republican Mac Matheson to fill a seat left open after Stewart Udall is named interior secretary. Morris Udall is sworn into office May 17.

Named to the Interior Committee and the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service.

1965

First wife, Pat, with whom he had six children, calls him at his Tucson office and tells him she wants a divorce.

Also that year, Udall irritates labor by voting Arizona's way on right-to-work legislation.

1967

Udall faces voters in Tucson to announce his opposition to the Vietnam War. The speech makes headlines from the Nogales Herald to The New York Times.

1968

Challenges House Speaker John McCormack, who was then 77, and loses in the Democratic Caucus.

That same year, marries Ella Royston, who was a staff member on the post office panel.

Publishes "The Job of the Congressman," considered a must-read for new Members of Congress.

1970

Runs against Hale Boggs for the post of majority leader. The vote in the Democratic Caucus: Boggs, 140; Udall, 88, and a conservative candidate, 17. Turns his "MO" button upside down so it read "OW" and considers returning to private law practice.

1972

Publishes "Education of a Congressman."

1974

On November 23, 1974, announces in New Hampshire he is a candidate for president.

1976

Enters--and loses -- 22 primaries.

Later, falls off a ladder, breaking both arms. He contracts viral pneumonia, suffers a burst appendix, gets peritonitis and shows sign of Parkinson's disease.

1977

Named chairman of the Interior Committee, becoming Arizona's first House committee chairman since 1952.

1979

Diagnosed as having Parkinson's disease, and incurable and debilitating nerve disorder.
 

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1980

Delivers keynote address at the Democratic National Convention in New York.

1982

He and his Tucson Democratic allies threaten to take the Arizona Legislature to court over its redistricting plan, which he contends unfairly splinters the Hispanic vote. Lawmakers compromise and place more of Tucson in the 2d Congressional District; runs for re-election there and wins easily.

1984

Announces that he will not seek the Democratic presidential nomination, saying the campaign would become a forum on Parkinson's disease.

1988

Finds the body of his wife, Ella, in the garage of their Virginia home. The death is ruled a suicide.

Later, publishes "Too Funny to be President."

1989

Marries his third wife, Norma Gilbert, a former Interior Committee aide.

1990

Announces his re-election bid will be his last.

1991

January 6, falls in his Arlington, VA, home, breaking four ribs, a shoulder blade and a collarbone. He is transferred to a nursing home at the Veterans Administration Medical Center.

January 24, the House votes to name California Democrat George Miller as acting chairman of the Interior Committee.

April 5, his wife, Norma, sends a letter to Speaker Foley saying her husband may have to resign unless his health makes a "marked improvement."

April 19: his office announces he will resign.


HON. MORRIS K. UDALL'S CAREER IN CONGRESS

[Placed in the Congressional Record by Senator Dennis DeConcini, November 21,
1991)


1964

Acts as floor whip for civil rights legislation.

1965

The legislative fight begins for the Central Arizona Project, and he joins an effort to build two dams in the Grand Canyon as part of the massive water project. Two years later, after environmentalists balk at the idea, he realizes the CAP will never become a reality with dams in the Grand Canyon. 


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1967

Challenges archaic House seniority system by successfully spearheading an effort to strip Adam Clayton Powell of his chairmanship of the House Committee on Education and Labor.

1968

The CAP bill is signed into law by President Johnson.

1969

Sparks an inquiry that flushes out the secret of the massacre of civilians at My Lai, a Vietnamese hamlet.

1970

Gains passage of the Postal Reform Act, which makes the Postal Service a semiprivate corporation.

1971

Is chief sponsor of the 1971 Campaign Reform Act, which made the first real national rules for campaign finance, limiting expenditures and contributions and providing for voluminous disclosure.

1972

Introduces legislation to put more than 100 million acres of Federal land in Alaska into new national parks, wildlife refuges and national forests.

1977

President Carter signs strip-mining legislation, which for the first time provides direction to the mining industry for reclaiming and restoring coal strip mine land.

1978

Sponsors Indian Child Welfare Act that establishes standards for placement of Indian children in foster or adoptive homes.

Also, plays a major role in passage of Carter's civil service reforms.

1979

Archaeological Research Protection Act passes, setting up a system for safeguarding Indian artifacts and other archaeological resources from vandalism and theft from public lands.

1980

President Carter signs the Alaska Lands bill into law. The bill doubles the size of the National Park System, doubling the size of the National Refuge System and tripling the size of the National Wilderness System.

1984

Arizona Wilderness Act of 1984 passes, protecting more than 1 million acres of State land.
 

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1987

Sponsors amendment to the Price-Anderson provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to provide additional money to compensate the public in the event of a nuclear accident.

1989

Wins passage of an Indian gaming act that provides for the first time minimum Federal regulations for gaming activities on reservations.

1990

Wins passage of the Arizona Desert Wilderness Act, which protects more than 2 million acres of Federal land from development. Cosponsors legislation to protect the Grand Canyon from the effects of water flows from Glen Canyon Dam.

Plays a key role in passage of the Tongass Timber Reform Act, ending huge Federal subsidies to two pulp mills that were cutting down the ancient forest in southeast Alaska. The bill also protects more than 1 million acres from logging and road building.



LEGISLATION SPONSORED BY HON. MORRIS K. UDALL

87TH CONGRESS (1961-1962)

H.R. 7240 -- Authorizes an exchange of lands at Wupatki National Monument, AZ, to provide access to certain ruins to add certain federally owned lands. Became Public Law 87136.

H.R. 10566 -- Provides for the withdrawal and orderly disposition of mineral interests in certain public lands in Pima County, AZ. Became Public law 87-747.

88TH CONGRESS (1963-1964)

H.R. 946 -- Authorizes the establishment of the Fort Bowie National Historic Site, in Arizona. Became Public Law 88-510.

H.R. 7419 -- Authorizes the conclusion of agreements with Mexico for joint construction, operation, and maintenance of flood control works on the lower Colorado River. Became Public Law 88-411.

89TH CONGRESS (1965-1966)

H.R. 1746 -- Defines "child" under the Civil Service Retirement Act to include adopted child but not stepchild for lump sum benefits. Became Public Law 89-407.

H.R. 3320 -- Authorizes the establishment of the Hubbell Trading Post National Historic Site, in Arizona. Became Public Law 89-148.

H.R. 6845 -- Provides that the basic compensation for teaching positions in overseas schools operated by the Department of Defense be the same as basic compensation for similar positions under the Government of the District of Columbia. Became Public law 89-391.

H.R. 7648 -- Authorizes long-term leases on the Papago Indian Reservation. Became Public Law 89-715.

H.R. 10281 -- Government Employees Salary Comparability Act.

Title 1. Federal Salary Adjustment Act--Provides for an increase in the compensation of Federal employees of approximately 4.5 percent. Provides for the reconsideration and review by the Civil Service Commission of "acceptable level of competence" for purposes of step increases. Increases to GS-10 (now GS-9) the maximum level at which overtime compensation may be paid.
 

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Provides for similar increase in the compensation of Postal employees and relocation allowances for such employees who are transferred.

Provides similar increases for employees in Department of Medicine and Surgery of the Veterans' Administration, for officers, and employees in the Foreign Service, employees in the legislative branch, and employees in the judicial branch.

Provides for an additional adjustment of salary rates in 1966 and periodically thereafter to make the Federal salary schedule comparable to the rates paid by private industry.

Provides severance pay, up to 1 year's pay, for employees who are involuntarily (except for cause) separated from the service. Bases such as pay on years of service and age.

Title Il. Federal Salary Review Commission Act--Provides for a 10 member Federal Salary Review Commission to review the compensation of Member of Congress, Justices, and salary levels under the Federal Executive Salary Act. Provides for the Commission to submit a report by January 1967, and periodically thereafter.

90TH CONGRESS (1967-1968)

H.R. 2154 -- Provides long term leasing for the Gila River Indian Reservation. Became Public law 90-182.

92D CONGRESS (1971-1972)

H.R. 15869 -- Provides that an action for money damages brought by the United States on behalf of a recognized tribe, band, or group of American Indians shall not be barred unless the complaints filled more than six years and ninety days after the right of action is accrued. Became Public Law 92-353.

H.R. 13825 -- Provides that an action for money damages brought by the United States on behalf of a recognized tribe, band, or group of American Indians, or on behalf of an individual Indian whose land is held in trust or restricted status, shall not be barred unless the complaint is filed more than eleven years after the right of action accrued or more than two years after a final decision has been rendered in applicable administrative proceedings required by contract or by law, whichever is later. Became Public Law 92-485.

93D CONGRESS (1973-1974)

H.R. 7730 -- The Secretary of Interior is authorized and directed to acquire through purchase within the so called San Carlos Mineral Strip as of January 24, 1969, all privately owned real property, taking title there to in the name of the United States in trust for the San Carlos Apache Indian Tribe. Became Public Law 93-530.

H.R. 3180 -- Franked Mail Amendment. The policy of the Congress that the privilege of sending mail as franked mail shall be established under this section in order to assist and expedite the conduct of the official business, activities, and duties of the Congress of the United States.

94TH CONGRESS (1975-1976)

H.R. 14227 -- Directs the Secretary of Agriculture to release the board of regents of the universities and State colleges of Arizona from the requirement that specified lands transferred by the United States for the use of the University of Arizona be used only for research or educational purposes. 


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95TH CONGRESS (1977-1978)

H.J. Res. 539 -- A resolution to amend the statute of limitations provisions in section 2415 of title 28, United States Code, relating to claims by the United States on behalf of Indians. Became Public law 95-64.

H.R. 4992 -- A bill to amend the Indian Financing Act of 1974 by revising the appropriations authorization for the Indian Business Development Program. Became Public law 95-68.

H.R. 8397 -- A bill to provide that a certain tract of land in Pinal County, AZ, held in trust by the United States for the Papago Indian Tribe, be declared a part of the Papago Indian Reservation. Became Public Law 95-361.

H.R. 10787 -- A bill to authorize appropriations for activities and programs carried out by the Secretary of the Interior through the Bureau of Land Management. Became Public Law 95-352.

H.R. 13972 -- A bill to designate the Great Bear Wilderness, Flathead National Forest, and enlarge the Bob Marshall Wilderness Flathead and Lewis and Clark National Forests State of Montana. Became Public Law 95-546.

H.R. 2 -- To provide for the cooperation between the Secretary of the Interior and the States with respect to the regulation of surface coal mining operations, and the acquisition and reclamation of abandoned mines, and for other purposes. Became Public law 95-87.

H.R. 3454 -- To designate certain endangered pubic lands for preservation as wilderness, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 95-237.

H.R. 10532 -- To amend Public Law 95-18, providing for emergency drought relief measures. An act to provide temporary authorities to the Secretary of the Interior to facilitate emergency actions to mitigate the impacts of the 1976-1977 drought. Became Public Law 95-226.

H.R. 13650 -- To authorize appropriations for activities and programs carried out by the Secretary of the Interior through the Bureau of Land Management. Became Public Law 95-352.

96TH CONGRESS (1979-1980)

H.R. 39 -- A bill to provide for the designation and conservation of certain public lands in the state of Alaska, including the designation of units of the National Park, National Wildlife Refuge, National Forest, National Wild and Scenic Rivers, and National Wilderness Preservation Systems, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 96-487.

H.R. 1825 -- A bill to protect archaeological resources owned by the United States, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 96-95.

H.R. 3661 -- A bill to increase the authorization of appropriations under the Act of December 22, 1974. Became Public Law 96-40.

H.R. 1885 -- A bill to amend Civil Service retirement provisions as they apply to certain employees of the Bureau of Indian Affairs and of the Indian Health Service who are not entitled to Indian employment preference and to modify the application of the Indian employment preference laws as it applies to those agencies. Became Public Law 96-135.

H.R. 5278 -- A bill to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to engage in feasibility investigations of certain water resource developments. Became Public Law 96-375.

97TH CONGRESS (1981-1982)

H.R. 2330 -- A bill to authorize appropriations to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in accordance with section 261 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 97-415.
 

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H.R. 4364 -- A bill to declare that the United States holds in trust for the Pascua Yaqui Tribe of Arizona certain land in Pima County, AZ. Became Public Law 97-386.

H.R. 5553 -- A bill to provide for the use and disposition of Miami Indians judgment funds in Dockets 124-b and 254 before the United States Court of Claims, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 97-376.

H.R. 6403 -- A bill to provide for the use and distribution of funds to the Wayndot Tribe of Indians in Docket 139 before the Indian Claim Commission and Docket 141 before the United States Court of Claims and for other purposes. Became Public Law 97-371.

H.R. 3809 -- A bill to provide for the development of repositories for the disposal of high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, to establish a program of research, development, and demonstration regarding the disposal of high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 97-425.

H.R. 4707 -- A bill to designate certain National Forest Lands in the State of Arizona as wilderness, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 98-406,

98TH CONGRESS (1983-1984)

H.J. Res. 158 -- A joint resolution to make technical corrections in the Act of January 25, 1983. Became Public Law 98-608.

H.R. 1746 -- A bill to authorize appropriations for the Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation Commission. Became Public Law 98-48.

H.R. 6206 -- A bill amending the Act of July 28, 1978 (P.L. 95-238) relating to the water rights of the Ak-Chin Indian Community and for other purposes. Became Public Law 98-530.

H.R. 4707 -- A bill to designate certain national forest lands in the State of Arizona as wilderness, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 98-406.

99TH CONGRESS (1985-1986)

H.R. 730 -- A bill to declare that the United States holds in trust for the Cocopah Indian Tribe of Arizona certain land in Yuma County, AZ. Became Public Law 99-23.

H.R. 1185 -- A bill to amend the Act establishing the Petrified Forest National Park. Became Public Law 99-250.

H.R. 2698 -- A bill to designate the United States Courthouse in Tucson, AZ, as the "James A. Walsh United States Courthouse". Became Public Law 99-213.

H.R. 4378 -- A bill to govern the establishment of commemorative works within the National Capital Region of the National Parks System, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 99-652.

H.R. 5430 -- A bill to amend the Gila River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community Judgment Distribution Plan. Became Public Law 99-493.

H.R. 1083 -- A bill to amend the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act to improve procedures for the Implementation of compacts providing for the establishment and operation of regional disposal for low-level radioactive waste; to grant the consent of the Congress to certain interstate compacts on low level radioactive waste; and for other purposes. Became Public Law 99-240.

H.R. 4216 -- A bill to provide for the replacement of certain lands within the Gila Bend Indian Reservation, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 99-503.

H.R. 4217 -- A bill to provide for the settlement of certain claims of the Papago Tribe of Arizona arising from the construction of Tat Momolik Dam, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 99-469.

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100TH CONGRESS (1987-1988)

H.J. Res 284 -- A joint resolution designating the week beginning June 21, 1987, as "National Outward Bound Week". Became Public Law 100-61.

H.R. 1963 -- A bill to amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to permit States to set aside in a special trust fund up to 10 per centum of the annual State funds from the Abandoned Mani Land Reclamation Fund for expenditure in the future for purposes of abandoned mine reclamation, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 100-34.

H.R. 2937 -- A bill to make miscellaneous technical and minor amendments to laws relating to Indians, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 100-153.

H.R. 3479 -- An Act to provide clarification regarding the royalty payments owed under certain Federal Onshore and Indian oil and gas leases, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 100-234.

H.R. 1414 -- A bill to amend the Price-Anderson provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to extend and improve the procedures for liability and indemnification for nuclear incidents. Became Public law 100-408.

H.R. 4102 -- A bill to provide for the settlement of the water rights claims of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community in Maricopa County, AZ and for other purposes. Became Public Law 100-512.

H.R. 4362 -- A bill to amend Section 3 of the Act of June 14, 1926, as amended (43 U.S.C. 869-2), to authorize the issuance of patents with a limited reverter provision of lands devoted to solid waste disposal, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 100-648.

H.R. 5232 -- A bill to grant the consent of the Congress to the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact. Became Public Law 100-712.

H.R. 5261 -- A bill to authorize and amend the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, and for other purposes, Became Public Law 100-713.

H.R. 4754 -- A bill to amend the Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation Act of 1972 to authorize appropriations for implementation of the development plan for Pennsylvania Avenue between the Capitol and the White House, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 100-415.

H.R. 1044 -- A bill to establish the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park in the State of California, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 100-348.

H.R. 1223 -- A bill entitled "Indian Self-Determination Amendments of 1987". Became Law 100-472.

101ST CONGRESS (1989-1990)

H.R. 2843 -- A bill to establish the Kino Missions National Monument in the State of Arizona. Became Public Law 101-344.

H.R. 2570 -- A bill to provide for the designation of certain public lands as wilderness in the state of Arizona. (Arizona Desert Wilderness Act of 1990; Fort McDowell Indian Community Water Rights Settlement Act of 1990; Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord Wild and Scenic River Study Act; Camp W.G. Williams Land Exchange Act of 1989; Take Pride in America Act; Civil War Sites Study Act of 1990; Clarks Fork Wild and Scenic River Designation Act of 1990.) Became Public law 101-628.

H.R. 5237 -- A bill to provide for the protection of Native American graves, and for other purposes. Became Public Law 101-601.

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Addresses and Special Orders Held in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate, Presented in Honor of The Honorable Morris K. "Mo" Udall, A Representative from Arizona, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session
Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1993