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About Us

Living The Future 8 - 2012


Last modified: February 4, 2013

Living The Future 8 - Welcome


Welcome

Living the future 8 logo

Join us for this two-day invitational event, April 23-24, 2012, for libraries that are innovating at a fast pace.

Conference will include panel discussions, presentations, breakout sessions, and poster displays on key topics.

Thank you to EBSCO for its generous support of Living the Future 8.

 Ebsco logo

Last modified: March 27, 2012

Living The Future 8 - 2012 - Program


Program

Plenary Sessions        Breakout Sessions        Poster Session

Videos, Power Point files, and Posters from the Plenary, Breakout, and Poster Sessions are available in the UA Campus Repository.

Schedule

Monday        Tuesday

Monday April 23, 2012
Time Event Location

8:30 -

9:00 a.m.

Continental breakfast provided

 Sign-up for Tuesday afternoon tours (optional)

Madera Room, Tucson Marriott University Park Hotel

9:00 -

9:15 a.m.

Welcome & opening remarks by Carla Stoffle, Dean of University Libraries, University of Arizona
Madera Room, Tucson Marriott University Park Hotel

9:15  -      

10:30 a.m.

Introduction of panel speakers by Robert Mitchell, Associate Dean, University of Arizona Libraries

Deans/Directors Panel

Organizational Realignment and Restructuring

(Each panelist takes 12 minutes to share thoughts and allow 15 minutes for Q & A from audience)

  • Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries, North Carolina State University
  • Carla Stoffle, Dean of University Libraries, University of Arizona
  • lorraine j. haricombe, Dean of Libraries, University of Kansas
  • Susan E. Parker, Deputy University Librarian, UCLA
  • Marlo Maldonado Young, Virtual Education Coordinator, University of California, San Diego Libraries

Madera Room, Tucson Marriott University Park Hotel

10:30 -     

11:00 a.m.

Break & walk to Main Library  

11:00 a.m. -

12:30 p.m.

Breakout Discussion Groups

(20-40 minute presentations followed by 50-60 minute group dialogue engaging participants on what each institution has implemented or is planning to implement regarding topic)

  •  Alternatives to Textbooks (led by Marilyn Billings, Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Librarian, University of Massachusetts Amherst)
  • Learning Environments - 21st Century Library (led by Patrick Deaton, Associate Director for Learning Spaces and Capital Management, and Susan Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries, North Carolina State University Libraries; and Jennifer Church-Duran, Assistant Dean for User Services, University of Kansas Libraries)

Main Library

 

 

 

A314

 

A315

 

 

A313

 

 

 

Special Collections Conference  Room

12:30 -    

1:30 p.m.

Boxed lunch provided
5th Floor Staff Lounge, Main Library
1:30 - 3:00 p.m.

Breakout Discussion Groups

(20-40 minute presentations followed by 50-60 minute group dialogue engaging participants on what each institution has implemented or is planning to implement regarding topic)

  •  Educational Role of Libraries (led by Jen Fabbi, Director, Research and Education, Jeanne Brown, Head of Assessment, Anne Zald, Head, Educational Initiatives, & Steven Hoover, Instructional Design Librarian, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries)

Main Library

 

 

 

A314

 

 

 

A315

 

Special Collections Conference Room

3:00 - 3:15 p.m. Break  
3:15 - 4:45 p.m.

Breakout Discussion Groups

(20-40 minute presentations followed by 50-60 minute group dialogue engaging participants on what each institution has implemented or is planning to implement regarding topic)

  •  Virtual Environments (led by Josh Boyer, Head of User Experience, North Carolina State University Libraries, and Scott Hanrath, Director of Integrated Technology Services, University of Kansas Libraries)
  • Value of Libraries (led by Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction and Associate Professor for Library Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Main Library

 

 

 

A314

 

 

A315

 

Special Collections Conference Room

 

Tuesday April 24, 2012
Time Event Location
8:30 - 9:00 a.m. Continental breakfast provided
Madera Room, Tucson Marriott University Park Hotel

9:00 -        

10:30 a.m.

Introduction of panel speakers by Robert Mitchell, Associate Dean, University of Arizona Libraries

Future of the Profession: Skills, Education, and Structure

  • Beverly P. Lynch, Professor of Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, UCLA
  • Gary Strong, University Librarian, UCLA
  • Deborah Turner, Assistant Professor, The iSchool at Drexel University
  • Kathleen De Long, Associate University Librarian (Finance and Human Resources), University of Alberta Libraries
Madera Room, Tucson Marriott University Park Hotel

10:30 -      

11:00 a.m.

 Break & walk to Main Library  

11:00 a.m. - 

12:30 p.m.

 Poster Session

Main Library

A313/A314

12:30 - 1:30 pm.

 Lunch & Wrap Up

  • Wrap Up/Closing Comments - Carla Stoffle
5th Floor Staff Lounge, Main Library
 2:00 p.m.

 Tours (optional)

  • Center For Creative Photography (special behind-the-scenes tour with Katharine Martinez, Director, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona)
  • Special Collections (tour with Archivist Chrystal Carpenter)
  • Information Commons & Research West: new faculty/graduate student area
  • Science-Engineering Library: 2nd floor space/furniture
 

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Plenary Sessions

Organizational Realignment and Restructuring

  • Susan K. Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries, North Carolina State University
  • Carla Stoffle, Dean of University Libraries, University of Arizona
  • lorraine j. haricombe, Dean of Libraries, University of Kansas
  • Susan E. Parker, Deputy University Librarian, UCLA
  • Marlo Maldonado Young, Virtual Education Coordinator, University of California, San Diego Libraries

Notes and videos from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Future of the Profession: Skills, Education, and Structure

  • Beverly P. Lynch, Professor of Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, UCLA
  • Gary Strong, University Librarian, UCLA
  • Deborah Turner, Assistant Professor, The iSchool at Drexel University
  • Kathleen De Long, Associate University Librarian (Finance and Human Resources), University of Alberta Libraries

Notes and videos from this session will be added to this page after the conference

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Breakout Sessions

Alternatives to Textbooks (led by Marilyn Billings, Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Librarian, University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Data Management and Curation (led by MacKenzie Smith, former Research Director, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Learning Environments - 21st Century Library (led by Patrick Deaton, Associate Director for Learning Spaces and Capital Management, and Susan Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries, North Carolina State University Libraries; and Jennifer Church-Duran, Assistant Dean for User Services, University of Kansas Libraries)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Archives, Special & Unique Collections (led by Tom Hyry, Director of Special Collections, UCLA Library)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Educational Role of Libraries (led by led by Jen Fabbi, Director, Research and Education, Jeanne Brown, Head of Assessment, Anne Zald, Head, Educational initiatives, & Steven Hoover, Instructional Design Librarian, University of Nevada, Las Vegas Libraries)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

On-Demand Information Delivery/Patron-Driven Acquisition (led by Stephen Bosch, Materials Budget, Procurement, and Licensing Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Scholarly Communication (led by lorraine j. haricombe, Dean of Libraries, University of Kansas)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Virtual Environments (led by Josh Boyer, Head of User Experience, North Carolina State University Libraries, and Scott Hanrath, Director of Integrated Technology Services, University of Kansas Libraries)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Operational Effectiveness and Staffing (led by Lars Leon, Head of Resource Sharing, University of Kansas Libraries )

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

Value of Libraries (led by Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction and Associate Professor for Library Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Notes from this session will be added to this page after the conference

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Poster Session

The ARL Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce: Refining One Approach to Diversity Recruitment

Mark A. Puente, Director of Diversity and Leadership Programs, Association of Research Libraries

Since 2000 the Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW) has provided financial support, training, and leadership development to over 150 master of library and information science (MLIS) students from traditionally underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups. Recent iterations of this Institute of Museum and Library Sciences (IMLS) and ARL-member funded program have focused on recruitment of students with academic backgrounds in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. This poster will highlight program successes with respect to outputs, long-term impact on the LIS profession, and the perceived effect on career tracks of program participants.

Career Research Beyond Google: Collaboration Done Right!

Jeannie An, Research Services Librarian, Ron Joyce Centre (RJC), DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University

Since 2009, the library has collaborated with the department of Social Sciences Inquiry Program, Soc Sci 2EL0 (Career Planning Through Experiential Learning) and has delivered one lecture for this course every term.  Social Sciences 2EL0 is a non-credit six week course where students are exposed to and engaged with interactive tools and resources through career planning and research.  Both the course and presentation have evolved and now include such discussion topics as effective use social media and the hidden job market.  Working closely with the instructor ensures students are provided the necessary tools not only graduate, but to also prepare them for the job market and future career development and success.

Data Management at the University of Arizona: Working Across Campus to Develop Support and Services

Chris Kollen, Data Curation Librarian, Scholarly Publishing and Data Management Team, University of Arizona Libraries

In January 2011, the National Science Foundation instituted a requirement that all grant proposals include a data management plan. In response, many academic libraries began to focus on developing library services that support storing and curating data in order to increase research productivity. The University of Arizona, with the Libraries taking a lead, wanted to look at how the campus could support researchers as they developed data management plans. With the goal of making substantial advances in this area, the Dean of Libraries designated 1 FTE librarian for data management, and the Dean and Vice-President for Research (VPR) established the Campus Data Management and Curation Advisory Committee with members from the Libraries, VPR's office, and faculty regarding data management, the Campus Committee's charge and recommendations (including what units need to collaborate), progress made, next steps, and useful tools and initiatives to keep an eye on.

Data-Driven Strategic Planning for Access Services

John Miller-Wells, Library Information Analyst, and Travis Teetor, Library Operations Supervisor, Access and Information Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

This poster will describe the process and role of the University of Arizona's Access Services and frontline public service staff in needs assessment and user service evaluation, specifically in understanding the voice of the customer. We will include information on our strategic planning process, resources required, data sources, methodology, analytical tools, and the outcomes of this process. Information in this poster was first presented at the 2010 Access Services Conference and has subsequently been updated for publication.

Digital Course Materials: Expanding Access & Reducing the Cost of Enrollment

Michael Brewer, Team Leader, Instructional Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

The cost and accessibility of textbooks and other required course materials has been an issue at both the local and national levels for a long time. Indicative of this is a new requirement in Arizona that universities provide students with a total cost of attendance for each course before they enroll. Universities must do more to improve students’ access to required course materials and to reduce the overall cost of education. In the past, supplying students with required course texts was delegated to the bookstore in coordination with teaching faculty. Today, with emerging electronic options and business models, a more nuanced, multi-tiered, and campus-wide approach may be possible and necessary. This poster will detail the major issues and describe some potential solutions.

Evolution of an Information Competency Graduation Requirement: Current Impact and Future Implications

Lorrita Ford, Director, Library Services, College of San Mateo

The College of San Mateo institutionalized information competency proficiency as a graduation requirement in Fall 2010.  This session will trace the evolution of the requirement from conception to implementation, the multiple ways that the requirement can be satisfied, and its impact on students and library services.

The Evolution of the Information Resources Management: UA Libraries’ experiences with Doing More with Less

Ricardo Andrade, Assistant Librarian, Jim Martin, Associate Librarian, and Ping Situ, Associate Librarian, Research Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

Like most academic libraries in this difficult economic climate, the UA Libraries have had to cope with constant budget pressures and challenges. Due to diminishing resources, the information resources management component of the Library is one of the areas that has had to be reevaluated regarding how to maximize existing resources to better meet users' needs. The poster will highlight some of the new approaches and strategies that the Library is utilizing to meet users' needs with limited resources in the changing environment.

Faculty Perceptions:  Next Generation Teaching & Learning Services for the Academic Library

Marlo Maldonado Young, Virtual Education Coordinator, University of California, San Diego Libraries

This poster presents qualitative data gathered through semi-structured interviews with faculty on how the academic library of the future can support digital teaching and student learning needs on the UC San Diego campus. Input from faculty across academic disciplines identified as early adopters of educational technology were interviewed in order to define and identify a preliminary framework for digital teaching and learning support services for the UC San Diego Libraries to consider. Faculty ideas that emerged present transformative opportunities that extend far beyond the current framework of “instructional services” provided by academic libraries.  Data also includes input on the role of the librarian in supporting faculty’s digital teaching.

First Steps: An Environment Scanning Process for Informing Decision-Making in Digital Humanities

Cynthia Elliott, Assistant Librarian, Research Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

Digital Humanities is a collaborative approach to humanist work using digital tools that encourage interdisciplinary scholarship and challenge current theoretical paradigms using technologies. This poster will present an environmental scanning process for discovering opportunities for the University of Arizona Libraries to take a leadership role in the area of Digital Humanities on campus. These first steps lead to identifying, collecting, and translating information about external influences into useful recommendations that provide input into our decision-making process.

Forming a New Team: Delivery, Description, and Acquisitions Team (DDAT)

Linda Dols, Library Information Analyst, Katie Lee, Library Information Associate, Deborah Quintana, Manager of Document and Production Services, & Jeanne Voyles, Team Leader, Description, Delivery, and Acquisition Team, University of Arizona Libraries

In the most recent restructuring of the University of Arizona Libraries in May 2011, a new team was formed: the Description, Delivery, and Acquisition Team (DDAT). Similar work in the Libraries was assigned to DDAT. The highest-priority work of DDAT is the acquisition and delivery of information needed to support our primary customers’ teaching, research, and learning. Ordering and interlibrary loan (ILL) support obtaining information; cataloging and metadata work support discovery; ILL and all document delivery services provide delivery of information. This team is also responsible for planning, coordinating, and implementing in-house digital scanning and reproduction work, which merges the application of metadata and cataloging on a single team. The functions of this team implement the information access/acquisition policies and apply the cataloging and metadata strategies, schema, and standards that are set by this team in coordination with other teams in the Libraries. This poster session will present the process used to form the new team, the implementation process, and how the team continues to cross-train, assign work, and measure success.

Librarians Bridging the Gap: From High School to University

Toni Anaya, Assistant Professor, Multicultural Studies Librarian, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Academic libraries have not typically been able to build partnerships with K-12 education in ways that could both impact our information literacy mission and the goals of our universities surrounding student achievement and academic persistence.  However, these partnerships are important in the big picture, as libraries try to affect information literacy and student achievement.  Partnerships with pre-university students can be accomplished in various ways, but one avenue is working through college preparation and academic outreach programs affiliated with the university.  Since 2010, the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries have been collaborating with the Office of Admissions on an innovative program working with high school seniors through the Nebraska College Preparatory Academy (NCPA).  The UNL Libraries have been able to demonstrate a strong connection with the students as they enter college, helping impact student retention and achievement statistics.  Moreover, the project has improved the information literacy skills of the cohort’s students, by starting to work with them from the high school level.

Library Leadership 2.0

Karen E. Downing, Education Liaison and Foundations and Grants Librarian, and Alexandra Rivera, Student Enrichment and Community Outreach Librarian, University Library, University of Michigan

Librarianship, like no other profession, has undergone great changes over the last several decades, including demographic shifts in our internal and external communities, sweeping technological changes, and other factors that impact how we conduct our work. The profession has accordingly organized to meet these changes. This poster is a preview of a forthcoming publication exploring Library Leadership in these new environs. Specifically the poster will present the evaluation of leadership thought, leadership needs in various contexts, current leadership development initiatives, and the application of recent leadership research to frame a new model of library leadership: Library Leadership 2.0.

A Local Look at the ARL 2030 Scenario Planning Project

Jennifer Church-Duran, Assistant Dean for User Services, University of Kansas Libraries

In 2010, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) developed an exciting new project, designed to support libraries in future visioning and preparation.  The result was a set of 4 “alternate futures” narratives (scenarios) that do not discuss libraries, but rather the research environment in which libraries will function.  These scenarios work together as a set, to shape and guide strategic conversation through highlighting critical uncertainties.  KU Libraries became one of the first ARL institutions to bring this work home.  We launched intensive, interactive workshops that offered our staff the opportunity to suspend disbelief and move beyond conventional understanding about our future.    This poster will provide an overview of the ARL scenario set, and explain the outcomes and best practices of KU Libraries’ work.

More Than an Online Pathfinder: Getting the Most Out of Online Course Guides

Erica DeFrain, Assistant Librarian, Instructional Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

With library budgets continuing to shrink and the ability to create online content becoming an accessible task for almost everyone, the push to offer more scalable online instruction services has never been stronger. The number of library course and subject guides has exploded in recent years, but are they really doing what librarians hope they are? This poster seeks to spark a new dialogue concerning the creation and use of online course guides by looking at the assumptions we hold and what practice has taught us. Who is using them? What is a course guide's lifespan? Do we have the data to support our pedagogical theories? What does the future hold? How can we make them better?

Online Credit Courses: Providing Effective Learning Environments for Students

Yvonne Mery, Assistant Librarian, Jill Newby, Associate Librarian, and Jeanne Pfander, Associate Librarian, Instructional Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

The Online Research Lab and the Information Research Strategies for Graduate Students and Researchers courses were created to address the needs of undergraduate and graduate-level students from across the University when the Libraries moved to an online instruction model. These one-credit courses have been successfully delivered to hundreds of students since their creation. In this time, the courses have gone through several reiterations and evaluations, and continue to be improved upon. Quantitative and qualitative data have shown that these credit courses are an effective and popular way to teach information literacy. This poster session will describe the courses and their creation, and present assessment data showing the effectiveness of the ORL course.

Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Bridging the Boundaries of Need and Access to Information Resources

Andrew See, Library Information Associate, Delivery, Description and Acquisitions Team, University of Arizona Libraries

As the University of Arizona Libraries employ a 21st century user-centered approach to information resource management, we have adopted a Patron-Driven Acquisitions program. Fundamentally, the program is based on the model of users as the drivers of library acquisitions. By imbedding order records in the library catalog and by identifying user needs through interlibrary loan requests, the library is able to acquire targeted information resources that more efficiently meet the research needs of our users. This service significantly enhances the user experience and allows the UA Libraries to see greater use of our resources.

Quick and (Mostly) Painless Space Usage Assessment Using iPads

Amanda Brite, Library Information Associate, Hayri Yildirim, Director of Facilities Planning and Management, Jeanne Pfander, Associate Librarian, and John Miller-Wells, Library Information Analyst, Library Space Usage Assessment Project Team, University of Arizona Libraries

The Library Space Usage Assessment project was initiated in September 2011 in an attempt to answer questions about how public spaces were currently being utilized at the University of Arizona Libraries. The project team utilized iPads and an online data collection form to gather data on customer activity over a period of three weeks during the fall 2011 semester. This poster presents an overview of the tools and methodology developed by the project team to conduct the assessment. The presentation also highlights the results of the project team's assessment efforts and how those results informed recent changes to library services.

The Relative Value Scale:  How Relevant Is a Journal to Your Institution’s Research & Instruction?

Jason C. Dewland, Assistant Librarian, Research Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

Due to significant cuts in the University of Mississippi's library budget, a ranking system was needed to determine the value of a journal to the local research and instruction needs. Major journal rankings products are not a strong resource to measure a journal's value because they exclude many journals and do not account for local research preferences. What was created was a simple algorithm to rank the business journal collection based on varying levels of usage, citations, and pricing. This poster will present an explanation of the algorithm, the resulting rank-order list, and what journals were actually cut.

Supporting Students Where They Are When They Need It: Scaling Instruction at the University of Arizona Libraries

Leslie Sult & Elizabeth Kline, Associate Librarians, Instructional Services Team, University of Arizona Libraries

Continuing on the University of Arizona Libraries' long history of leveraging technology to support students in attaining information fluency, this poster will highlight two approaches for supporting students where and when they need assistance. We will discuss how the Libraries selected, developed, and refined a scalable and interactive online approach to database instruction and suggest an approach other libraries can adopt to make pedagogically sound database tutorials. We will also share a local tool designed to push course-appropriate library content and services to all courses using a course management system and our plans for modifying the tool so that faculty and librarians can work together to efficiently and easily create customized, integrated course guides.

To Fee or Not to Fee: Building Student Support for Additional Library Revenue

Cheryl Cuillier, Instructional Librarian, Robyn Huff-Eibl, Access and Information Services Team Leader, and Michael Brewer, Instructional Services Team Leader, University of Arizona Libraries
 
The University of Arizona has had a student library fee since 2006. The fee started out at $15/year for students and now stands at $120/year. In FY2011-12, fee revenue for the University Libraries is expected to be about $3.5 million—a critical chunk of our budget. This poster will describe the approach that enabled the Libraries to successfully implement a fee. Garnering support from student government leaders and advisory boards has been crucial. The poster will also detail how student fee money is used, challenges we’ve faced, and strategies that might work at your institution.

Writing for Educators Instead of Grade Levels

Cass Fey, Curator of Education, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona Libraries

This session will focus on successful educators' guides written to encourage and facilitate interdisciplinary use of collections by K-12 and university faculty. This tactic for relating collections to classroom study bypasses the time-consuming methodology of writing for specific grade levels. The Curator of Education at the Center for Creative Photography will discuss her approach to writing for the educated individual to assess and present collection subject matter and interpretation strategies to students at various grade levels and across curricula. It will include samples of collection descriptions, discussion questions, and methods for interpreting photographs.

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Last modified: May 24, 2012

Living The Future 8 - 2012 - Speakers


Speakers

 

Marilyn Billings

Marilyn Billings is the Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, a position she has held since 2006. She provides campus and regional leadership and education in alternative scholarly communication strategies and gives presentations on author rights, new digital publishing models, and the role of digital repositories in today’s research and scholarship endeavors. Billings is also actively involved in regional and national workshops on these topics, most recently the international SPARC (Scholarly Publishing and Resource Coalition) OA workshop held in Kansas City in March 2012. Current projects include her oversight of the UMass Amherst’s digital repository ScholarWorks and her recent role as the leader of the campus’ Open Education Initiative. For a complete list of Billings’ presentations and publications, visit http://works.bepress.com/marilyn_billings/.

 

Stephen Bosch

Stephen Bosch—Materials Budget, Procurement, and Licensing Librarian from the University of Arizona—has been involved with various aspects of acquisitions, collection development, and library administrative services during his 30+ year tenure at the University of Arizona. He has held positions as Acquisitions Librarian and Coordinator for Collection Development, Information Access Librarian, Financial and Administrative Services Librarian, as well as his current position. He has been chair of many committees, teams, councils, and projects focusing on information resource development and management, user needs assessments, licensing issues, and serials/monographs acquisitions both at the University of Arizona and nationally. Of his many publications, the most visible are the annual articles on serials pricing he authors for Library Journal. He is the 2006 recipient of the American Library Association ALCTS Harrassowitz Award for Leadership in Library Acquisitions and is currently Chair of the American Library Association’s ALCTS Acquisitions Section.

 

Josh Boyer

Josh Boyer has worked at the North Carolina State University Libraries since 1999, first as Reference Librarian for Distance Learning Services and later as Associate Head of Research and Information Services. He worked on virtual reference and “Ask Us” services, usability testing, and project management for web initiatives including NCSU’s homegrown QuickSearch tool, Citation Builder, GroupFinder, and the implementation of Summon. In February 2012, Boyer took on the role of head of a new department at NCSU Libraries, User Experience, which combines the Libraries’ web team and Learning Commons unit. They will focus on the user experience in both virtual and physical spaces. Prior to working in libraries, Boyer spent 3 years as a newspaper reporter. Boyer earned an MSLS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1999, and a B.A. in English with Honors in Creative Writing from UNC in 1994.

 

Jeanne Brown

Jeanne Brown is Head of Assessment for the Libraries at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She served on the ACRL Task Force to revise the Standards for Libraries in Higher Education, has been a member of the ACRL Assessment Committee, and is currently on the ACRL Value Committee and its subcommittee to develop the Value Bibliography.
 

 

Jennifer Church-Duran

Jennifer Church-Duran is the Assistant Dean for User Services at the University of Kansas (KU) Libraries. She is responsible for a division which encompasses instruction, reference & outreach, access services, interlibrary loan/document delivery, and branch oversight. Before becoming Assistant Dean, Church-Duran served as the Head of Instructional Services, overseeing both information literacy and technology training. Prior to coming to KU, she was the Head of Media and Computer Services and the Head of the Information Commons at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV).  Church-Duran has a master’s degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Kentucky. Her professional and research interests include faculty/librarian collaboration, information literacy and curricular integration, and the impact of learning spaces on student persistence and success.

 

Patrick Deaton

Patrick Deaton is the Associate Director for Learning Spaces and Capital Management at the North Carolina State University Libraries. He is responsible for working with the design and construction team for the $115 million James B. Hunt Jr. Library, scheduled to open in early 2013, to ensure that the building will meet the needs of the Libraries, students, and faculty. He also oversees a number of renovation projects at the Libraries’ existing facilities. Previously, Deaton was an Architect and Project Manager with J. Hyatt Hammond Associates in Greensboro, N.C., where he designed a number of library and higher education projects. He received his architectural training at the University of Virginia and Princeton University.

 

Kathleen De Long

Kathleen De Long is Associate University Librarian (Human Resources and Teaching/Learning), University of Alberta Libraries. She has been a frequent guest lecturer in the Master’s in Library Science (MLIS) program at the University of Alberta and sessional instructor for the library leadership and management course. In 2003, she was awarded the Miles Blackwell Award for Outstanding Academic Librarian by the Canadian Association of College and University Libraries. As well as her MLIS, De Long has a master’s in Public Management from the University of Alberta, and just recently completed her doctorate in Managerial Leadership in the Information Professions at Simmons College. Her current research focuses upon investigating leadership within the library profession.

 

Jen Fabbi

Jen Fabbi is tenured Associate Professor and Director of Research and Education in the Libraries at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She joined the library faculty at UNLV in 1999 after earning her graduate degree at the University of Arizona. Fabbi has served in several leadership capacities in the Libraries and on campus including: Head of the Curriculum Materials Library; Interim Director of Libraries Technical Services; Special Assistant to the Dean of Libraries; and two terms on the Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate. During the 2009-2010 academic year, she was on reassignment to the Office of the Associate Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, concentrating on an Undergraduate Education reform proposal, which was subsequently approved by the Faculty Senate in fall 2011. Fabbi’s current research is on factors impacting the information literacy of first-year college students, and she will graduate with her Ph.D. in Higher Education Leadership this May.

 

Scott Hanrath

Scott Hanrath is Director of Integrated Technology Services / Assistant Librarian at the University of Kansas Libraries, where among other things he works with library discovery systems, digital journal publishing services, and the KU ScholarWorks institutional repository.  In addition to his experience in a academic research library, Scott has worked as a developer and analyst in a university central IT unit, a university-based survey statistics research center, and a private science and mathematics education research firm.  His interests include open source software development and the digital humanities.  Scott has an MS in Information Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a BA (English and Philosophy) from St. Olaf College.

 

 lorraine j. haricombe

lorraine j. haricombe is Dean of the University of Kansas Libraries, which serves 25,000 students and 1,300 faculty. One of the founding members of the Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions, haricombe also serves as the Provost’s designate for open access implementation at KU. She is a past chair of the Greater Western Library Alliance Board of Directors, a current member of the Lyrasis Board, PubMed’s Central Advisory Committee, and a member of SPARC’s Steering Committee. Recently, she participated in the South African Research Library Consortium’s Executive Management Academy. Prior to joining KU in 2006, she was Dean of Libraries at Bowling Green State University. She holds doctoral and master’s degrees in Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.

 

Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe

Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe is Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction and Associate Professor for Library Administration at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is also co-chair of the Association of College and Research Libraries’ Value of Academic Libraries Committee. Her research interests focus on assessment, performance measurement, information literacy, student learning, and professional development for academic librarians. She co-edited the new book Environments for Student Growth and Development: Libraries and Student Affairs in Collaboration (ACRL, 2012).

 

Steven Hoover

Steven Hoover is the Instruction Design Librarian at the Lied Library of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He is a two-time graduate of Indiana University (School of Library and Information Science - MLS and B.A.s in English/Psychology) and the 2009 ACRL Immersion Teacher Track Program. He has previously held positions at the Harvard Kennedy School Library and Trinity University. His research interests include instructional design, assessment, curriculum reform, and pedagogy.  While at Trinity University, he taught a first-year seminar course titled “Dude, Where’s My Cape: Reading and Understanding Graphic Novels.” Most recently, he served as the lead facilitator for the UNLV Hotel Faculty Institute on Capstone & Course Design and the UNLV Faculty Institute on First Year Seminars.
 

Tom Hyry

Tom Hyry is Director of UCLA Library Special Collections, a position he has held since March 2010.  In this capacity he has led the integration of five formerly separate units into a single, library-wide special collections department dedicated to acquiring, preserving, and providing access to a premier collection of archives, manuscripts, rare books, photographs, ephemera, and other rare and unique historical materials covering a vast number of subjects, eras, and geographic areas. Prior to coming to UCLA, he spent 13 years in two different positions in the Yale University Library: Head of the Manuscript Unit at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and Head of Arrangement and Description in the Manuscripts and Archives department. Hyry has published articles and given papers on a number of topics in the archival field, including backlog management, appraisal of faculty papers, electronic records in manuscript collections, and the evolution of the finding aid. He has held numerous professional posts, including serving as an elected member of the Council of the Society of American Archivists. He holds a master’s degree in Library and Information Studies with an archival concentration from the University of Michigan and a bachelor’s degree in History from Carleton College.

 

Lars Leon

Lars Leon is the Head of Resource Sharing and Delivery Services at the University of Kansas Libraries. He has also contributed more time in the library staff development and assessment activities. His research and service interests, focusing on interlibrary loan best practices, assessment, and staff development, have led him to give a variety of presentations and workshops that has taken him everywhere from Kansas to Stockholm and Bulgaria.
 

Beverly P. Lynch

Beverly P. Lynch is Professor of Graduate School of Education & Information Studies at UCLA, Director of the UCLA Senior Fellows Program, and the Founding Director of the California Rare Book School. Lynch has worked in various professional positions in the libraries of the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Marquette University, Yale University, and the City of Plymouth (England) public Library. She received her B.S. degree in English and Music from North Dakota State University, her M.S. in Library Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The University of Wisconsin presented her with its 2009 Distinguished Alumna Award in 2009. Lynch served as President of the American Library Association from 1985-1986 and as Interim President of the Center for Research Libraries from 2000-2001. She received the 2009 Joseph W. Lippincott Award for distinguished service to the profession of librarianship, the 2012 Melvil Dewey Award for creative professional achievement in library management and training, and the University of Wisconsin’s 2009 Distinguished Alumna Award. She is the author of six books and has lectured and published widely in the areas of library management, organizational design, and standards for libraries.

 

Susan Nutter

Susan Nutter, Vice Provost and Director of Libraries at North Carolina State, is a nationally recognized librarian, receiving the 2005 Librarian of the Year award from Library Journal. In 1999, Susan was awarded the Hugh Atkinson Memorial Award, which recognizes leaders in the profession who have contributed significantly to improvements in the area of library automation, management, and library development and research. Under Nutter’s leadership, the NCSU Libraries have risen considerably in the rankings of university research libraries and gained an international reputation as a technology incubator and leader in the digital library age. The library is also known for the extraordinary caliber of its staff and the quality and innovation of the service it offers. Currently, Nutter is deeply involved in the planning for the opening of the new James B. Hunt Jr. Library on NC State’s Centennial Campus.  The Hunt Library is scheduled to open in January 2013. This iconic building is designed to be nothing less than the best learning and collaborative space in the country.

 

Susan E. Parker

Susan E. Parker has held the position of Deputy University Librarian for the University Library at UCLA since 2005. Starting as a reference librarian in corporate law firms, she has held leadership positions in public and administrative services in the libraries of Tufts University and Harvard Law School. Prior to coming to UCLA, she was Associate Dean of the Library at California State University, Northridge from 1997-2005. She is an MLS graduate of Queens College, City University of New York. She earned an M.A. in U. S. History from Indiana University, and graduated with honors in History from Earlham College in Richmond, Ind. She received her Ph.D. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Capella University. Dr. Parker has held elected and volunteer offices in the Library Organization and Management Section (LOMS) of LAMA, and she is a past chair of the ACRL Law and Political Science Section (LPSS). She has served on several ALA awards and program committees and was a long-time book reviewer for Library Journal. She is a member of the 2001 class of the Stanford-California State Library Institute and a member of the 2003 class of UCLA Senior Fellows in Information Studies. Parker’s expertise is in library organizations, facilities planning, disaster recovery, budgeting, and assessment processes.
 

MacKenzie Smith

MacKenzie Smith is an independent consultant on library and information technology strategy. She was formerly Research Director at the MIT Libraries, overseeing various research projects in the area of Semantic Web for scholarly communication and digital data curation, including long-term data preservation and archiving. She was formerly the Associate Director for Technology in the MIT Libraries, overseeing the libraries’ technology operations and strategy, and the Project Director for MIT’s collaboration with Hewlett-Packard to build DSpace, the open source digital archive platform. She is a Science Fellow at the Creative Commons, working on data governance policy, and was a Special Consultant to design and lead the new ARL E-Science Institute. Prior to MIT, Smith managed the Harvard University Library’s Digital Library Program Manager and held IT positions at Harvard and the University of Chicago.

 

Carla J. Stoffle

Carla J. Stoffle has been Dean of Libraries at the University of Arizona since 1991. Prior to coming to Arizona, Carla was Deputy Director for Public Services at the University of Michigan Library and the Assistant Chancellor for Educational Services at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. She also served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Barbados, in the West Indies. Carla is an active leader in the library profession. She is past president of the Association of College and Research Libraries, past chair of the Center for Research Libraries and the Greater Western Library Alliance, and past treasurer of the American Library Association. She is currently a trustee for Amigos Library Services and serves on the Association of Research Libraries’ Transforming Research Libraries Steering Committee. Stoffle has been honored with American Library Association’s Elizabeth Futas “Catalyst for Change Award,” the Academic Research Librarian of the Year Award, the Arizona Librarian of the Year Award, and the Vision Award from the University of Arizona’s Commission on the Status of Women.

 

Gary E. Strong

Gary E. Strong became UCLA’s seventh University Librarian on Sept. 1, 2003. His appointment marked a return to California, where he served as California State Librarian from 1980 through 1994.  One of his particular accomplishments during that time was the creation of the California Research Bureau, one of the state’s finest public policy organizations. From 1994 until 2003, Strong was head of the Queens Borough Public Library, the busiest public library in America. Serving the most diverse county in the nation, this system encompasses a central library, 62 community libraries, and 6 adult learning centers. Strong began his career at the University of Idaho Library and the Latah County (Idaho) Free Library and subsequently worked at the Markeley Residence Library at the University of Michigan, public libraries in Oregon and Washington, and the Washington State Library. Strong is a native of Moscow, Idaho. He earned a bachelor’s degree in Education from the University of Idaho in 1966 and a master of Library Science degree from the University of Michigan in 1967.  In 2010, the University of Idaho bestowed upon him the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters in recognition of his distinguished career accomplishments.

 

Deborah Turner

Deborah Turner is Assistant Professor at the Drexel University College of Information Science and Technology. Prior to Drexel, Turner worked as a librarian in multiple capacities—including senior manager, outreach coordinator, and manuscript specialist—most recently at the University of California, Santa Cruz. After encouragement she received from her participation in a previous Living the Future conference, Turner went on to earn a doctorate from the University of Washington, with a year of Fulbright funding at the University of Tampere, Finland. Currently, she teaches academic libraries, leadership, management, and international information issues.

 

Marlo Maldonado Young

Marlo Maldonado Young is the Coordinator of Virtual Education at the University of California, San Diego’s Social Sciences & Humanities Library, a new position for the UCSD Libraries established in 2011. Most recently, Marlo has conducted exploratory interviews with faculty identified as early adopters of educational technology in order to identify and define a preliminary framework for digital teaching and learning support services as the libraries restructure. Prior to this, Marlo has worked at UCSD’s Center for Library & Instructional Computing Support and has also served as the Coordinator of Cross-College Outreach for the system of UCSD libraries. Marlo is a past Fellow with the National Library of Medicine, a current fellow in ARL’s Leadership & Career Development Program, and earned her MLS degree from the University of Arizona.
 

Anne E. Zald

Anne E. Zald is Head of Educational Initiatives at the University Libraries at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Previously she held positions at the University of Washington Libraries, Oberlin College Library, and Wayne State University Library. Since 1999 Zald has been on the faculty for ACRL’s Immersion programs, providing professional development experiences to academic librarians in the areas of teaching, managing, and assessing instruction programs. While at the University of Washington, she served as a lecturer for the Information School, teaching courses on information problem solving for undergraduates and “Sources of Information in the Social Sciences” for the MLIS program. Zald earned an AMLS from the University of Michigan and a B.A. in History from Oberlin College.
 

 

Last modified: April 19, 2012

Living The Future 8 - 2012 - Accommodations


Accommodations

Guests will stay at the Tucson Marriott University Park, which is situated at the main gate of The University of Arizona. Just steps from the front door is Tucson's most vibrant social and cultural neighborhood: over 30 restaurants, shopping, touring Broadway shows, and 4 museums. Rooms are equipped with coffee maker, mini fridge (some rooms), luxurious bedding (down comforters, custom duvets), iron and ironing board, bathrobe, and hairdryer. High-speed internet is wireless in public area and wireless and wired-for-business in guest rooms. (note: fees may apply for internet access).

Tucson Marriott University Park

880 East Second Street

Tucson, AZ 85719

Phone: 520.792.4100

Toll free: 1.866.596.7897

FAX: 520.882.4100

Reservations

Reserve your room online

or

Call the hotel directly to reserve your rooms. Mention "Living the Future"  to receive conference discount. If sharing rooms, individuals will need to list the name of the participant that they are sharing a room with so both names are on the reservation. (note: conference discount applies if you book before March 23, 2012).

Single Rate: $119

Double Rate: $119

Additional Guest per room: $15.00 /night

 

 

 

Last modified: April 12, 2012

Living The Future 8 - 2012 - Getting Around


Getting Around

Directions from Tucson Marriott University Park to the University of Arizona Main Library:

http://g.co/maps/mf5sw

Walking map from Tucson Marriott University Park Hotel to Main Library

 

Directions from  the Tucson International Airport to the Tucson Marriott University Park (this hotel does not provide a shuttle service):

http://g.co/maps/wtsqn

  • Distance from airport to hotel: 8.6 miles
  • Travel time: 22 minutes
  Alternate transportation:

Directions from Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport to the Tucson Marriott University Park (this hotel does not provide a shuttle service):

 http://g.co/maps/gyvqk

  • Distance from airport to hotel: 113 miles
  • Travel time: 1 hour 56 minutes

Alternative transportation:

 

Parking

Cherry Street Garage (near Main Library)

Main Gate Garage (near Tucson Marriott University Park hotel)

Nearby Shops & Restaurants

On Campus at the Student Union:

Near the Tucson Marriott University Park:

 

Last modified: April 12, 2012

Living The Future 8 - 2012 - Contacts


Contacts

Planning Committee:

You may wish to contact one of us individually. Below is a list of members of the planning committee for LTF8. Click on any of the names to e-mail that individual.

Rebecca Blakiston

Cheryl Cuillier

Robyn Huff-Eibl

Jeanne Voyles

 

Last modified: April 12, 2012